oculomotor response

oc·u·lo·mo·tor re·sponse

widespread myogenic potential evoked by visual stimuli.

oc·u·lo·mo·tor re·sponse

(okyū-lō-mōtŏr rĕ-spons)
Widespread myogenic potential evoked by visual stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Age-group differences in inhibiting an oculomotor response.
It comprises a complex and finely tuned interactive oculomotor response to a range of sensory and perceptual stimuli [1-3].
Accordingly, the results from the present experiment, though showing that there is a clear oculomotor response associated with the error in judged depth, does not resolve its cause.
Because this never corresponded to more than 70 ms, a value well below the time needed to initiate an oculomotor response (Ginsborg, 1953; Rashbass & Westheimer, 1961; Westheimer & Mitchell, 1956), we can be very confident that no vergence movements could be involved.
Other topics include automated sleep deprivation as a tool for basic sleep research in animal models of affective disorders, the role of dopamine in the antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation, oculomotor responses during sleep deprivation, and excessive yawning.
Processes that operate within this range of the attentional time course include the endogenous orienting mechanism and inhibition of return--a mechanism which influences attentional orientation, by temporarily biasing either attention (Posner & Cohen, 1984; Posner, Rafal, Choate, & Vaughan, 1985) or oculomotor responses (Abrams & Dobkin, 1994) against returning to a previously stimulated location.
Dr Mhairi Day from Glasgow Caledonian University for 'Investigation of real life oculomotor responses in myopia'
Kotulak and Morse (1995b) looked at oculomotor responses with the Apache HMD and found that the change in the level of accommodation was greater if participants attended to the overlaid symbology as opposed to the background scene.
Oculomotor responses with aviator helmet-mounted displays and their relation to in-flight symptoms.
Although there has been much interest in oculomotor responses with aviator displays, previous research has dealt mainly with display simulations (Hull, Gill, and Roscoe, 1982; Moffitt, 1989; Norman and Ehrlich, 1986).
The first was whether the oculomotor responses of Apache aviators with in-flight visual symptoms differ from those of asymptomatic Apache aviators.
Both oculomotor responses were measured in short (15-s) trials to prevent adaptation (Schor, Kotulak, and Tsuetaki, 1986).