oculomotor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to oculomotor: oculomotor nucleus, Oculomotor muscles

oculomotor

 [ok″u-lo-mo´tor]
pertaining to or affecting eye movements.
oculomotor nerve the third cranial nerve; it is mixed, that is, it contains both sensory and motor fibers. Various branches of the oculomotor nerve provide for muscle sense and movement in most of the muscles of the eye, for constriction of the pupil, and for accommodation of the eye. See anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.

oc·u·lo·mo·tor

(ok'yū-lō-mō'tŏr),
Pertaining to the oculomotor cranial nerve.
[L. oculomotorius, fr. oculo- + L. motorius, moving]

oculomotor

/oc·u·lo·mo·tor/ (-mōt´er) pertaining to or effecting eye movements.

oculomotor

(ŏk′yə-lō-mō′tər)
adj.
1. Of or relating to movements of the eyeball: an oculomotor muscle.
2. Of or relating to the oculomotor nerve.

oculomotor

[-mō′tər]
Etymology: L, oculus, eye, motor, mover
pertaining to movements of the eyeballs.

oculomotor

adjective Referring to:
(1) Movement of the eye;
(2) The oculomotor nerve, see there.

oc·u·lo·mo·tor

(ok'yū-lō-mō'tŏr)
Pertaining to the oculomotor cranial nerve.
[L. oculomotorius, fr. oculo- + L. motorius, moving]

oculomotor 

Pertaining to movement of the eyes, or to the oculomotor nerve.

oculomotor

pertaining to or affecting eye movements.

oculomotor nerve
the third cranial nerve; it contains motor and parasympathetic fibers. Various branches of the oculomotor nerve provide for muscle sense and movement in most of the muscles of the eye, for constriction of the pupil, and for accommodation of the eye. See also Table 14.
oculomotor nerve paralysis
causes pupillary dilatation, absence of pupillary light reflex, ventrolateral deviation of the eye, defective eye movement and palpebral ptosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
NVP was the only tested oculomotor function that appeared to be affected by the level of primary blast the Cadre group was exposed to during the study.
Role of visual attention in cognitive control of oculomotor readiness in students with reading disabilities.
Carlsson J and Rosenhall U (1990): Oculomotor disturbances in patients with tension headache treated with acupuncture and physiotherapy.
Exon deletions and intragenic insertions are not rare in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 2.
A diagnosis of clinically probable or possible PD was confirmed if patients met the following criteria: 1) manifestation of at least two of the following symptoms: resting tremor, bradykinesia, or cogwheel rigidity; 2) no suggestion of a parkinsonian syndrome due to trauma, brain tumor, infection, cerebrovascular disease, other known neurologic disease, or treatment with dopamine-blocking or dopamine-depleting agents; 3) no atypical features such as prominent oculomotor palsy, cerebellar signs, vocal cord paresis, severe orthostatic hypotension, pyramidal signs, amyotrophy, or limb apraxia; 4) asymmetric onset; and 5) if treatment with levodopa had been initiated, symptomatic improvement after treatment.
Whiplash injury and oculomotor dysfunctions: clinical-posturographic correlations.
The Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), the autonomic, parasympathetic component of the oculomotor complex, It is divided into two main regions.
Basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits: parallel substrates for motor, oculomotor, "prefrontal" and "limbic" functions.
Subjective history of provocation and duration of dizziness are outlined and then a series of tests including checking for orthostatic hypotension, oculomotor exam, neck ROM, vestibular ocular reflex cancellation, head thrust, functional vertebral artery test, and tests for BPPV.
Wernicke encephalopathy presents clinically as the classic triad of encephalopathy, oculomotor dysfunction, and gait ataxia; however, the combination of all three is only observed in one-third of patients with WE.
In addition to the pons (113), LGN (114) and occipital cortex (107), these waves have been recorded from thalamus, cortex, oculomotor nuclei, cerebellum, amygdala, cingulate gyrus and hippocampus.
Visual acuity deteriorates with age, including loss of light transmissivity, oculomotor impairments (ability to move the eyes in following visual targets), cataracts, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration (damage or break down of the macula, a small central point of the light-sensing retina that processes the sharp central vision used for reading and similar detail tasks).