occupational therapy


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occupational

 [ok″u-pa´shun-al]
1. pertaining to a vocation or source of livelihood.
2. pertaining to the skills a person needs to live independently and carry on a desired lifestyle; see also occupational performance areas.
occupational diseases diseases caused by any of various factors involved in a person's occupation; there are many types. Dusts are a common cause; fine particles of silica can lead to silicosis among miners, glassworkers, and persons involved in the manufacture of cement and similar materials. Another cause is toxic gases and vapors, which can result in respiratory disorders and may also involve the blood and other body systems. Many different substances are toxic, including some usually considered therapeutic when in sufficient doses. Certain kinds of chemicals can affect the skin, causing some forms of dermatitis. Working conditions, such as high temperatures or humidity, excessive noise, changes in air pressure, or continuous exposure to sun and wind, can cause varied disorders such as heat exhaustion, impaired hearing or vision, decompression sickness, or skin conditions.

Control and prevention of occupational diseases is very much a major concern of the individual worker, management, the community health service, and the state and federal governments. It involves education on how to protect oneself against occupational hazards; management's cooperation in supplying proper equipment and conditions; inspection and testing services performed by the government; the existence of adequate medical and first-aid services at the location of the work; adequate hospitalization facilities, insurance and compensation; and research into methods to provide safety and good health.
occupational therapist a health care professional who provides services designed to restore self-care, work, and leisure skills to patients/clients who have specific performance incapacities or deficits that reduce their abilities to cope with the tasks of everyday living. The occupational therapist evaluates and treats problems arising from developmental deficits, physical illness or injury, emotional disorders, the aging process, and psychological or social disability. Graduates of an accredited degree program who have completed field work requirements and are eligible for the certification examination given by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT).
occupational therapy the use of purposeful activity to help individuals acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for the performance of life tasks. It is defined by the American Occupational Therapy Association as “the art and science of directing man's participation in selected tasks to restore, reinforce, and enhance performance, facilitate learning of those skills and functions essential for adaptation and productivity, diminish or correct pathology, and promote and maintain health. Its fundamental concern is the development and maintenance of the capacity, throughout the life span, to perform with satisfaction to self and others those tasks and roles essential to productive living and to the mastery of self and environment.”

The broad concerns of occupational therapy include all factors that facilitate the development of adaptive skills and increase performance capacity, and also those factors that may impede or restrict an individual's ability to function. In addition to those persons recovering from physical injury or illness, occupational therapy serves others who because of age, poverty, cultural differences, or psychologic and social disability, have difficulty coping with the tasks of living. The reference to occupation in the title is to be understood in the context of goal-directed use of time, energy, interest, and attention.

As is true of all types of therapeutic measures, the skills that are taught and the tasks prescribed for the client take into account his individual needs, abilities, and interests. This implies a thorough evaluation of his physical, mental, and emotional status and an acceptance of him as a person. In consultation with other members of the health care team, the occupational therapist designs a program of therapy that will lead to the goal of a productive life and satisfactory adjustment on the part of the patient. The address of the American Occupational Therapy Association is 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220.
occupational therapy assistant a health care professional who works under the supervision of an occupational therapist in planning and implementing programs to restore the self-care, work, and leisure skills of clients/patients. Those certified by the American Occupational Therapy Association are designated Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA).

therapy

 [ther´ah-pe]
activity therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the prescription of and assistance with specific physical, cognitive, social, and spiritual activities to increase the range, frequency, or duration of an individual's (or group's) activity.
aerosol therapy see aerosol therapy.
animal-assisted therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful use of animals to provide affection, attention, diversion, and relaxation.
anticoagulant therapy see anticoagulant therapy.
antineoplastic therapy see antineoplastic therapy.
antiplatelet therapy the use of platelet inhibitors such as aspirin, dipyridamole, or sulfinpyrazone, to inhibit platelet adhesion or aggregation and so prevent thrombosis, alter the course of atherosclerosis, or prolong vascular graft patency.
art therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitation of communication through drawings or other art forms.
aversion therapy (aversive therapy) a form of behavior therapy that uses aversive conditioning, pairing undesirable behavior or symptoms with unpleasant stimulation in order to reduce or eliminate the behavior of symptoms. The term is sometimes used synonymously with aversive conditioning.
behavior therapy see behavior therapy.
carbon dioxide–oxygen therapy see carbon dioxide–oxygen therapy.
chest physical therapy see under physical therapy.
client-centered therapy a form of psychotherapy in which the emphasis is on the patient's self-discovery, interpretation, conflict resolution, and reorganization of values and life approach, which are enabled by the warm, nondirective, unconditionally accepting support of the therapist, who reflects and clarifies the patient's discoveries.
cognitive therapy (cognitive-behavioral therapy) a directive form of psychotherapy based on the theory that emotional problems result from distorted attitudes and ways of thinking that can be corrected. Using techniques drawn in part from behavior therapy, the therapist actively seeks to guide the patient in altering or revising negative or erroneous perceptions and attitudes.
collapse therapy a formerly common treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis in which the diseased lung was collapsed in order to immobilize it and allow it to rest. pneumonolysis and thoracoplasty are methods still sometimes used to collapse a lung and allow access during thoracic surgery.
combined modality therapy treatment of cancer using two or more types of therapy, such as with chemoradiotherapy. Called also multimodality therapy.
compression therapy treatment of venous insufficiency, varicose veins, or venous ulceration of the lower limbs by having the patient wear compressing garments such as support hose.
continuous renal replacement therapy hemodialysis or hemofiltration done 24 hours a day for an extended period, usually in a critically ill patient.
convulsive therapy treatment of mental disorders, primarily depression, by induction of convulsions. The type almost universally used now is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), in which the convulsions are induced by electric current. In the past, drugs were sometimes used.
couples therapy marital t.
diet therapy treatment of disease by regulation of the diet.
electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) (electroshock therapy) see electroconvulsive therapy.
endocrine therapy treatment of disease by means of hormones; called also hormonal or hormone therapy.
estrogen replacement therapy administration of an estrogen to treat estrogen deficiency, such as that occurring after menopause; there are a number of indications, including the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and coronary artery disease, and the prevention and treatment of vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and of thinning of the skin and vaginal epithelium, atrophic vaginitis, and vulvar atrophy. In women with a uterus, a progestational agent is usually included to prevent endometrial hyperplasia. Called also hormone replacement therapy.
exercise therapy: ambulation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of and assistance with walking to maintain or restore autonomic and voluntary body functions during treatment and recovery from illness or injury.
exercise therapy: balance in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as use of specific activities, postures, and movements to maintain, enhance, or restore balance.
exercise therapy: joint mobility in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of active or passive body movement to maintain or restore joint flexibility.
exercise therapy: muscle control in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of specific activity or exercise protocols to enhance or restore controlled body movement.
family therapy
1. group therapy of the members of a family, exploring and improving family relationships and processes, understanding and modifying home influences that contribute to mental disorder in one or more family members, and improving communication and collective, constructive methods of problem-solving.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting family members to move their family toward a more productive way of living.
gold therapy chrysotherapy.
group therapy see group therapy.
helium-oxygen therapy see helium-oxygen therapy.
hemodialysis therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of extracorporeal passage of the patient's blood through a hemodialyzer. See also hemodialysis.
hemofiltration therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as cleansing of acutely ill patient's blood via a hemofilter controlled by the patient's hydrostatic pressure. See also hemofiltration.
highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) the aggressive use of extremely potent antiretroviral agents in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection.
hormonal therapy (hormone therapy) endocrine therapy.
hormone replacement therapy the administration of hormones to correct a deficiency; usually used to denote estrogen replacement therapy occurring after menopause.
host modulating therapy efforts to control periodontal disease by directly targeting the host response; an example is the use of drugs that do this, such as sub-antimicrobial doses of doxycycline, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, or bisphosphonates.
humidification therapy (humidity therapy) the therapeutic use of air supersaturated with water to prevent or correct a moisture deficit in the respiratory tract; see also humidity therapy.
immunosuppressive therapy therapeutic immunosuppression.
inhalation therapy the term formerly used for respiratory care (def. 3).
intravenous therapy (IV therapy) in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administration and monitoring of intravenous infusions of fluids and medications.
leech therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of medicinal leeches to help drain replanted or transplanted tissue engorged with venous blood.
marital therapy a type of family therapy aimed at understanding and treating one or both members of a couple in the context of a distressed relationship, but not necessarily addressing the discordant relationship itself. In the past, the term has also been used in a narrower sense to mean what is defined as marriage therapy, but that is increasingly considered a subset of marital therapy. Called also couples therapy.
marriage therapy a subset of marital therapy that focuses specifically on the bond of marriage between two people, enhancing and preserving it.
milieu therapy
1. treatment, usually in a psychiatric treatment center, that emphasizes the provision of an environment and activities appropriate to the patient's emotional and interpersonal needs.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of people, resources, and events in the patient's immediate environment to promote optimal psychosocial functioning.
multimodality therapy combined modality therapy.
music therapy
1. the use of music to effect positive changes in the psychological, physical, cognitive, or social functioning of individuals with health or educational problems. Music therapy is used for a wide variety of conditions, including mental disorders, developmental and learning disabilities, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions related to aging, brain injury, substance abuse, and physical disability. It is also used for the management of acute and chronic pain and for the reduction of stress.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as using music to help achieve a specific change in behavior or feeling.
neoadjuvant therapy in single-agent therapy or combined modality therapy for cancer, initial use of one modality, such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, to decrease tumor burden prior to use of another modality, usually surgery.
nutrition therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administration of food and fluids to support metabolic processes of a patient who is malnourished or at high risk for becoming malnourished. See also nutrition.
occupational therapy see occupational therapy.
optometric vision therapy a treatment plan prescribed to correct or improve specific dysfunctions of the vision system; it includes, but is not limited to, the treatment of strabismus (turned eye), other dysfunctions of binocularity (eye teaming), amblyopia (lazy eye), accommodation (eye focusing), ocular motor function (general eye movement ability), and visual-motor and visual-perceptual abilities.
oral rehydration therapy (ORT) oral administration of a solution of electrolytes and carbohydrates in the treatment of dehydration.
oxygen therapy see oxygen therapy.
peritoneal dialysis therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administration and monitoring of dialysis solution into and out of the peritoneal cavity. See also peritoneal dialysis.
physical therapy see physical therapy.
play therapy see play therapy.
pulp canal therapy root canal therapy.
PUVA therapy [psoralen + ultraviolet A], a form of photochemotherapy for skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo; oral psoralen administration is followed two hours later by exposure to ultraviolet a radiation.
radiation therapy see radiation therapy.
recreation therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful use of recreation to promote relaxation and enhancement of social skills.
reminiscence therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as using the recall of past events, feelings, and thoughts to facilitate pleasure, quality of life, or adaptation to present circumstances.
renal replacement therapy therapy such as hemodialysis or transplantation that takes the place of nonfunctioning kidneys. See also continuous renal replacement therapy.
replacement therapy treatment to replace deficient formation or loss of body products by administration of the natural body products or synthetic substitutes. See also replacement. Called also substitution therapy.
respiratory therapy respiratory care.
root canal therapy that aspect of endodontics dealing with the treatment of diseases of the dental pulp, consisting of partial (pulpotomy) or complete (pulpectomy) extirpation of the diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty root canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive sealing material, and obturation of the canal with a nonirritating hermetic sealing agent. Called also pulp canal therapy.
shock therapy obsolete term for convulsive therapy.
simple relaxation therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of techniques to encourage and elicit relaxation for the purpose of decreasing undesirable signs and symptoms such as pain, muscle tension, or anxiety.
speech therapy the use of special techniques for correction of speech disorders.
substitution therapy replacement therapy.
swallowing therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating swallowing and preventing complications of impaired swallowing.
thrombolytic therapy the administration of drugs for thrombolysis (dissolution of a thrombus in an artery), to reduce the size of occlusion and thereby reduce damage to muscular tissue; the coronary artery is a commonly used site. Agents commonly used are streptokinase and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA).
thyroid replacement therapy treatment of hypothyroidism by administration of thyroxine, usually in the form of levothyroxine sodium. Called also thyrotherapy.
ultraviolet therapy see ultraviolet therapy.

oc·cu·pa·tion·al ther·a·py (OT),

therapeutic use of self-care, work, and recreational activities to increase independent function, enhance development, and prevent disability; may include adaptation of tasks or environment to achieve maximum independence and optimal quality of life.

occupational therapy

n. Abbr. OT
The use of productive or creative activity in the treatment or rehabilitation of physically or emotionally disabled people.

occupational therapist n.

occupational therapy (OT)

a health rehabilitation profession designed to help people of all ages with physical, developmental, social, or emotional deficits regain and build skills that are important for functional independence, health and well-being. See also occupational therapist.

oc·cu·pa·tion·al ther·a·py

(ok'yū-pā'shŭn-ăl thār'ă-pē)
Therapeutic use of self-care, work, and recreational activities to increase independent function, enhance development, prevent disability, and achieve optimum quality of life.

occupational therapy

The teaching and supervision of specially selected occupations to the sick and injured in order to exercise mind and body, arouse and sustain interest, promote confidence and overcome disability. The aim of occupational therapy is the inculcation of new work interests leading to complete rehabilitation.

occupational therapy

not a significant part of veterinary activity, but the term is applied to the teaching of tricks and activity patterns to big cats in captivity so that they escape boredom.
References in periodicals archive ?
Favill School of Occupations, which is thought to be the first formal school of occupational therapy.
To learn more about occupational therapy services at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center and River Road Physical Therapy, visit www.
The emergence of more opportunities where occupational therapy is needed guarantees the future of the profession and creates a robust job market.
Bethesda, MD: American Occupational Therapy Association.
Linda Shalik, chairwoman of the occupational therapy department at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway.
van den Heever will become West Coast University's Founding Dean and Program Director of its Master of Science of Occupational Therapy program.
Her advice to those entering the industry is to "be open minded and know you have endless opportunities in occupational therapy.
The session, which takes place on July 4 at the Princess of Wales Hospital, Bridgend, is open to anyone in Swansea, Bridgend and Neath Port Talbot thinking about applying for an occupational therapy university course, including mature students and those already in the NHS.
Hambric has been named director of the new Occupational Therapy Assistant Program under development at New River Community and Technical College (W.
This article posits that if occupational therapy in Aotearoa New Zealand is to have a significant presence in the health care of older people, practitioners need to provide primary health promotion in the community.
com)-- Stanbridge College, a technical college that offers Masters, Bachelors and Associate of Science degrees and diploma programs in Healthcare and Information Technology, Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) students recently donated over $1700 to the Special Olympics Southern California.
Muscat, Nov 13 (ONA) Medical Services at the Sultan's Armed Forces will organize tomorrow (Monday) the 1st Occupational Therapy Conference in the Sultanate under the auspices of Sayyidah Dr.

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