occult


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Related to occult: Satanism, occult fracture

occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

/oc·cult/ (ŏ-kult´) obscure or hidden from view.

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

[əkult′]
Etymology: L, occultare, to hide
hidden or difficult to observe directly, such as occult prolapse of the umbilical cord or occult blood.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.

occult

obscure or hidden from view.

occult blood test
examination, microscopically or by a chemical test, of a specimen of feces, urine, gastric juice, etc., to determine the presence of blood not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood in the stools.
occult heartworm infection
infection by Dirofilaria immitis in which circulating microfilariae cannot be detected in the peripheral blood by the usual test methods.
occult spavin
see occult spavin.
occult virus
the virus or infectious agent cannot be isolated but there is strong circumstantial evidence that it is present, e.g. scrapie prion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though written with the specialist in mind, this work would be accessible to anyone with a background in early modern English history or the history of the occult.
The findings suggest that "clinical practices and regional referral patterns may impact local rates of occult uterine sarcoma and should be considered during patient counseling and when developing clinical recommendations," Dr Lin concluded.
Positron emission tomography (PET) is the lastest addition to the armoury in adequate detection of occult lymph node metastases.
One of the readerly pleasures of Occult Knowledge is repeatedly encountering moments in which characters cannot explain their actions (or those of others), but can only presume an invisible force of sympathetic attraction or, to the contrary, an unseen antipathy.
When Crowley died in 1947, the magical and occult tradition over which he cast so great a shadow fractured into many organizations.
The relationship between occult HBV infection and liver disease is still not fully understood.
With seven chapters, Section Three "Staging the Victorian Afterlife: From Magic Shows to Dinner Parties" centers on performers and performance in Victorian spiritualist and occult practice, and on questions of authenticity and legitimacy.
Smith-Dalton, a historian and writer, considers the history of spiritualism and the occult in Salem, Massachusetts.
Looking at the physical findings and investigation results patient was diagnosed as a case of right occult breast cancer with right axillary lymph node metastasis.
Pathologists also looked for occult metastases in bone marrow aspirates from 3 413 women in the same cohort.
Satin reported, noting that nearly half of the babies in both groups developed occult HBV infections.