occlusal plane


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oc·clu·sal plane

, plane of occlusion
an imaginary surface that is related anatomically to the cranium and that theoretically touches the incisal edges of the incisors and the tips of the occluding surfaces of the posterior teeth; it is not a plane in the true sense of the word but represents the mean of the curvature of the surface.
See also: curve of occlusion.
Synonym(s): bite plane

occlusal plane

Etymology: L, occludere, to close up, planum, level ground
a plane passing through the occlusal or biting surfaces of the teeth. It represents the mean of the curvature of the occlusal surface. Also called biteplane. See also curve of Spee.

oc·clu·sal plane

, plane of occlusion (ŏ-klūzăl plān, ŏ-klūzhŭn)
Imaginary surface related anatomically to the cranium and theoretically touches the incisal edges of the incisors and the tips of the occluding surfaces of the posterior teeth.

oc·clu·sal plane

, plane of occlusion (ŏ-klūzăl plān, ŏ-klūzhŭn)
1. Plane established by incisal and occlusal surfaces of teeth. Because occlusal surfaces of teeth do not all lie on a flat surface, the plane is an "average" one.
See also: curve of occlusion
2. In complete denture fabrication, surface of wax occlusion runs contoured to position teeth in denture.
Synonym(s): bite plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mandibular occlusal plane was surgically decreased 19 degrees.
Wolford, Chemello, and Hilliard (24, 25) previously reported on alteration of the occlusal plane to maximize functional and aesthetic results in patients with healthy and stable TMJs.
This is related to the total joint prostheses, muscle detachments, and fibrosis around the joints and is not related to the alteration of the occlusal plane angle.
Occlusal plane alteration in orthognathic surgery--Part I: Effects on function and esthetics.
5 mm to +2 mm), and the average occlusal plane angle change was +0.
Patients predisposed to ICR are usually teenage girls in their pubertal growth phase; they typically have high occlusal plane angle facial types and class II skeletal and occlusal relationships.
Her treatment included 1) presurgical orthodontics to continue to align and level the dental arches; 2) surgery (Figure 3b), including a) bilateral repositioning of the TMJ articular disc, ligament repair with Mitek anchors, and removal of hyperplastic synovial tissue; b) bilateral mandibular ramus osteotomies to advance the mandible in a counterclockwise direction; c) multiple maxillary osteotomies to advance, expand, and decrease the occlusal plane angulation by downgrafting the posterior aspect of the maxilla; and d) augmentation genioplasty; and 3) postsurgical orthodontics to finish and retain.