occipital horn


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pos·te·ri·or horn

1. the occipital or posterior division of the lateral ventricle of the brain, extending backward into the occipital lobe;
See also: posterior column.
2. the posterior horn or gray column of the spinal cord as appearing in cross section. The posterior horn [TA] or dorsal horn [TAalt] contains spinal laminae I-VI [TA] of Rexed. The nuclei of the posterior horn are the marginal nucleus [TA] (nucleus marginalis [TA]), gelatinous substance [TA] (substantia gelatinosa [TA]), nucleus proprius [TA], secondary visceral grey substance [TA] (substantia visceralis secundaria [TA]), internal basilar nucleus [TA] (nucleus basilar internus [TA]), medial cervical nucleus [TA] (nucleus cervicalis medialis [TA]), posterior nucleus of lateral funiculus [TA] (nucleus posterior funiculi lateralis [TA]), and the lateral cervical nucleus.

occipital horn

Any of the broad, calcified protrusions exostoses that extend caudally from the base of the skull, seen in X-linked type IX Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which is related to defective copper metabolism, resulting in 2º lysyl oxidase deficiency and by extension, collagen defects.
References in periodicals archive ?
They may circulate freely throughout the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathways or become attached to the ependyma anywhere in the ventricles, but their predilection is for the occipital horn of the lateral ventricles and fourth ventricle.
The CT scan organised by the ophthalmologist showed "a proencphalic dilatation of the occipital horn of the left lateral ventricle with loss of cortex affecting the medial aspect of the occipital lobe" and was thought to be longstanding.
A tiny new lesion involving the posterior right thalamus and a slight increase in periventricular T2 signal adjacent to the atrium and occipital horn of the left lateral ventricle appeared.
There are two short occipital horns and three temporal horns on each side, of which the external horns are the shortest (Horowitz, 1955; Sherbrooke, 2003).
Because patients are usually scanned in the supine position, particularly important locations include the interpeduncular cistern, the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles, the quadrigeminal plate cistern, and the dependent portions of the Sylvian fissures (Figure 1).