obturator

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obturator

 [ob´too͡-ra″tor]
1. a disk or plate that closes an opening.
2. a prosthesis for closing an acquired or congenital opening of the palate (cleft palate).
obturator sign pain on outward pressure on the obturator foramen as a sign of inflammation in the sheath of the obturator nerve, probably caused by appendicitis.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tū-rā'tŏr),
1. Any structure that occludes an opening.
2. Denoting the obturator foramen, the obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
3. A prosthesis used to close an opening in the hard palate, usually in a cleft palate.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator

/ob·tu·ra·tor/ (ob´tu-rāt″er) a disk or plate, natural or artificial, that closes an opening.

obturator

(ŏb′tə-rā′tər, -tyə-)
n.
1. An organic structure, such as the soft palate, that closes an opening in the body.
2. A prosthetic device serving to close an opening in the body.

obturator

[ob′tərā′tər, ob′tyərā′tər]
Etymology: L, obturare, to close
1 a device used to block a passage or a canal or to fill in a space, such as a prosthesis implanted to bridge the gap in the roof of the mouth in a cleft palate.
2
Usage notes: nontechnical.
an obturator muscle or membrane.
3 a device that is placed into a large-bore cannula during insertion to prevent potential blockage by residual tissues.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr)
1. Any structure that occludes an opening.
2. Denoting the obturator foramen, the obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
3. A prosthesis used to close an opening of the hard palate, usually a cleft palate.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator

Any device, object or anatomical structure that closes or obstructs an opening or cavity.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr)
1. A prosthesis used to close an opening in the hard palate, usually in a cleft palate.
2. Any structure that occludes an opening.
3. Denoting obturator foramen, obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator (ob´toorātur),

n a prosthesis used to close a congenital or acquired opening in the palate. See also aid, prosthetic speech.
Enlarge picture
Cleft palate obturator.
obturator, hollow,
n that portion of an obturator made hollow to minimize its weight.

obturator

a disk or plate that closes an opening, e.g. to close a cleft palate temporarily or permanently.

obturator muscles
the muscles that rotate the thigh laterally. See also Table 13.
obturator nerve degeneration
causes permanent obturator nerve paralysis (below).
obturator paralysis
commonly follows pressure on the obturator nerve during parturition; causes inability to adduct the thighs and the cow does the splits. When recumbent the legs are splayed with one on either side of the body.
Enlarge picture
Obturator paralysis. By permission from Sack W, Wensing CJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, Saunders, 2002
References in periodicals archive ?
Feeding plate obturator was fabricated for three patients, while removable prosthesis was fabricated for 15 patients.
The fabrication of obturator is than required to keep it open which follows all the basic prosthodontic principles used in conventional oral prosthesis.
There have been very few case reports in the literature of acute obturator internus or externus strains and to the authors' knowledge this is the first report involving both obturator internus and externus without other hip structure injuries (6, 7).
The reusable obturators are reprocessed within the hospital to help reduce waste and offer a lasting alternative to disposable devices.
By expanding our line of access to include these new reusable obturators, Teleflex continues to affirm its commitment to addressing these needs and providing effective solutions that help enhance patient safety.
ASSOCIATION BETWEEN OBTURATOR AND GROWTH PARAMETERS OF COMBINED CLEFT PALATE AND LIP CASES IN THE INTERVENTIONAL GROUP
The primary objective of an interim obturator is to make the patient functional, by promoting closure or separation between the oral and surgical (actually nasal) chambers.
An extremely smooth transition between the obturator and cannula helps eliminate friction and eases insertion through the dilated fascial tissue.
The portfolio consists of two pending United States applications which disclose approaches to consolidating surgical navigation systems into optically-transparent neurosurgical obturators.
The study was conducted to observe Quality of Life (QoL) in oral cancer patients after provision of maxillary obturators.