obtrusive

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obtrusive

(ŏb-troo′siv) [L. obtrudere, to thrust against]
1. Aggressively and unpleasantly noticeable.
2. Forced into one's awareness.
3. Starkly contrasted with the environment.
obtrusiveness (′siv-nĕs)
References in periodicals archive ?
But Hambleton councillors refused permission in September, citing the height of the house and obtrusiveness of the gable at the rear, a decision upheld by a Government planning inspector.
In its response to GOWM, the council said: "The main objective of the policy is to ensure that there is full consideration of alternatives and that telecommunications equipment is sited in optimal locations which take account of technical considerations, visual obtrusiveness and other amenity issues.
Everyone's sense of Obtrusive and Non-Obtrusive is not the same; obtrusiveness is in the eye of the beholder.
The Messenia-wide results from UMME are indecisive on the point of the obtrusiveness of ritual activity in the Hellenistic period, when the number of unquestioned shrines, which held more or less steady (at 10 or 11) through Archaic and Classical times, decreases to seven (Fig.
Technological advancements in the last decade have created cost-effective automated prompting devices with the ability to deliver the same level of prompting with less human interaction and obtrusiveness and often less human effort in managing prompt delivery (e.
In addition, because the diaphragm is worn completely inside the vagina, it avoids the obtrusiveness of the female condom and is less likely to interfere with intimacy and sexual pleasure.
Revisiting the scene of the crime in response to a subpoena 12 years later, Broomfield and co-director Joan Churchill here focus more on Aileen herself, and this time around, Bloomfield's obtrusiveness pales beside the bewildered rage of the seven-time killer, who changes her story hourly.
As revolutionaries and resisters try to undermine each other's position by 'neutralizing, confronting, or discrediting' (Zald and Useem 1987: 248) each other's discourses, they raise 'the cost of (Zald and Useem 1987: 260) the obtrusiveness of their conflicting movements.
Alltucker contends that all sand and gravel operations are required to produce rigorous, state-approved plans to minimize the obtrusiveness of their mines while they function and to return them to environmentally acceptable uses after they play out.
This enabled her to tape interactions in private hospital rooms from two perspectives with less movement and obtrusiveness and still keep both the nurse and patient in view regardless of where the nurse was standing.
Some journalistic habits promote obtrusiveness -- for example, the automatic inclusion of a subject's age, surrounded by commas, when age is beside the point: He discussed his plans with his partner, Mary Doe, 35, before he made his final decision.