obstinate

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ob·sti·nate

(ob'sti-năt),
1. Firmly adhering to one's own purpose or opinion, even when wrong; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty. Synonym(s): intractable (2) , refractory (2)
2. Synonym(s): refractory (1)
[L. obstinatus, determined]

obstinate

(ŏb′stə-nĭt)
adj.
Difficult to alleviate or cure.

ob′sti·nate·ness n.

ob·sti·nate

(ob'sti-năt)
1. Firmly adhering to one's own purpose or opinion, even when proven wrong; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty.
Synonym(s): intractable (2) , refractory (2) .
2. Synonym(s): refractory (1) .
[L. obstinatus, determined]
References in classic literature ?
Each maintained his opinion with sufficient obstinacy, as is usual in all such cases; the attendants were appealed to, but they had not been near enough to hear Wamba's directions.
Of all this the people are well apprised, and understand how far to carry their obstinacy, where their liberty or property is concerned.
Lastly, Philippe would perhaps not have taken his brother behind the scenes of the Opera if Raoul had not been the first to ask him, repeatedly renewing his request with a gentle obstinacy which the count remembered at a later date.
I felt provoked by her obstinacy, but to excuse her to myself as far as I could, I suggested that perhaps she had never been used to eat in the company of men, and that her family might have taught her that she ought to behave prudently and discreetly in the presence of her husband.
Not being able to imagine what could be the cause of so much obstinacy the King began to fear, lest, in spite of all his precautions, she might have heard of the charms of the Prince his son, whose goodness, youth and beauty, made him adored at Court.
We chose to begin our mission with the lady of the village, and hoped that her prejudice and obstinacy, however great, would in time yield to the advice and example of her husband, and that her conversion would have a great influence on the whole village, but having lost several days without being able to prevail upon her to hear us on any one point, we left the place, and went to another mountain, higher and better peopled.
But this untractableness may be carried too far, and may degenerate into obstinacy, perverseness, or disingenuity.
The sense of sleep was upon me, and with it the obstinacy which sleep brings as outrider.
I will not say there was a mutiny on board, but after a reasonable period of obstinacy, Captain Farragut (as Columbus did) asked for three days' patience.
So, I suppose, this obstinacy and perversity were pleasanter to them than any advantage.
The result was that even if the king's troops remained quietly in their camp, it was evident that some day or other, Buckingham, who only continued in the Isle from obstinacy, would be obliged to raise the siege.
It is I who lose my cause, and it is ill-luck, obstinacy, and folly which have caused it to be decided against me.