obsolescence


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ob·so·les·cence

(ob'sō-les'ens),
Falling into disuse; denoting abolition of a function.
[L. obsolesco, to grow out of use]

obsolescence

[ob′səles′əns]
Etymology: L, obsolescere, to decay
1 a falling into disuse because of age or loss of function.
2 a state of being useless.
References in periodicals archive ?
To go further in the fight against the obsolescence of the products, it is advisable to act in favor of the prolongation of their life.
For instance, the idea of urban obsolescence was initiated by real estate assessors.
A Broader Move: EU-Wide Initiatives to Combat Planned Obsolescence
External obsolescence of real property can occur if a poor economy leads to increases in the number of comparable properties on the market or the level of local unemployment, or drops in occupancy or rental rates.
Managerial obsolescence is in relation to the knowledge, skill and attitude and therefore we have the following two definitions: Jones & Cooper (1980) defines obsolescence as the extent to which a manager's knowledge and skills have failed to keep pace with the current and likely future requirements of his job.
All of these companies have benefited from COG's resources which include education seminars, training and networking opportunities to enable them to manage the problem of obsolescence.
1), a compilation of the best proactive practices from across DoD Services and agencies for managing the risk of obsolescence.
The chapters give detailed attention to the considerable and numerous problems of maintaining perpetual access to digital resources and the difficulty of managing the fast-moving forces of technology and obsolescence.
Economic obsolescence is a form of depreciation, or loss in value, caused by unfavorable external conditions.
This implies that storage hardware environments will completely turn over in every four to five years and the removable media will completely migrate to a new media in ten years or less before facing the obsolescence factor.
In a key unpublished decision of California's Second District Court of Appeals, Treasure Chest Advertising v County of Los Angeles, the court held that assessors are required to take economic obsolescence into account when valuing property.
The bottom line: Our ability to manage and manipulate technology can be the difference between economic empowerment -- or marginalization and obsolescence.