observer bias

observer bias

(ŏb-zĕr′vĕr) [″]
Distortions introduced into a research investigation by the expectations and/or knowledge of the individuals collecting the data.
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Part two discusses different types of research designs, including survey, experimental, case study, ethnography, and action research, with part three honing in on the specific data collection techniques of questionnaires, individual and group interviews, observation, and document analysis, as well as discussing how the Internet can be used to facilitate participant recruitment, questionnaire administration, reduction of observer bias, and other aspects of research.
The Company also misled investors regarding the design of its two Lemtrada pivotal trials, the 323 and 324 trials, specifically failing to disclose that the trials contained high levels of placebo effect and observer bias which tainted the results, and thereby lowered the likelihood of approval of Lemtrada by the FDA.
This assumption is sometimes violated (Chen 1999, 2000) and information regarding heterogeneity in observer bias should be modeled (Graham and Bell 1989) because it can produce negatively biased estimates.
Thus, to minimize observer bias associated with knowing the recording was to be played, we randomly played the recording during 10 of the 20 instances.
There is also the risk of observer bias (the authors are all employees of the company that performed the testing) and participant bias (the subjects are clients of the company and knew that they were being interviewed by a representative of the company).
Evaluation of vessel selection and observer bias is based on a formal review of bias in NMFS observer programs (Volstad and Fogarty (2)).
However, considering the zeal and hype surrounding the "iodine project," the possibility of unconscious observer bias must be considered.
Recommendation 5: NIFS should encourage research on human observer bias and sources of human error in forensic examinations.
It is a convenient diagnostic tool due to its precision, lack of observer bias and reproducibility.
The technique of altering the data to change the result is observer bias.
Azimuths were randomly taken from the receiving station being evaluated to each of the 4 beacon locations to avoid observer bias (Lee et al.