obscure

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obscure

(ŏb-skūr′) [L. obscurus, hide]
1. Hidden, indistinct, as the cause of a condition.
2. To make less distinct or to hide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists use this kind of picture, called a coronagraph, in which the sun is obscured, to better see the sun's atmosphere, the corona.
Motorists approaching the roundabout from the A46 are unable to see a 40mph sign because it is obscured by a bush.
Yesterday, his conviction was quashed by two senior High Court judges in London, who ruled that, because of an obscured sign at the side of the road, he had not had sufficient warning that he was passing from a 40mph zone into a 30mph stretch.
Yesterday, his conviction was quashed by two senior High Court judges in London who ruled that, because of an obscured sign, he had not had sufficient warning he was passing from a 40mph zone into a 30mph stretch.
Mr Coombes said at the recent hearing that the overgrown hedgerow had obscured not only the speed limit signpost but also other signs, including one warning drivers of a school ahead.
Here, Arnolfini's face floats behind the bubble helmet's glass, most of his dark robes obscured by the pillowy spacesuit, while his bare hand clasps that of his wife, who stands in all her verdant finery on lunar sands.
When they arrived, two men (later identified as Scottie Pauley and Edward Elmore) were standing near a truck obscured by trees, cooking methamphetamine.
Moustafa is a master at historical research and has often brought to the study of history (especially Egyptian history) a novel and iconoclastic perspective that is buttressed by impeccable research and an articulate presentation of often surprising and long obscured data.
And is hers the smiling visage half obscured by the box--which expands when you click on it to provide a verbose answer and a possibly, related link to a recent Hillier project.
They were aware that these walls obscured the sightline.
These essays also show that in public history settings, the presentation of social history remains in a state of evolution, sometimes embraced but more often neglected or purposefully obscured.
Yet for some men it faded as they acquired other adult identities; and Kuehn observes, following Anthony Molho, that female bastards were even better able to blend because marriage or the convent obscured their uncertain relationship to their father's lineage.