oblique

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oblique

 [o-blēk´]
slanting; inclined.

ob·lique

(ob-lēk'),
Slanting; deviating from the perpendicular, horizontal, sagittal, or coronal plane of the body. In radiography, a projection that is neither frontal nor lateral.
[L. obliquus]

oblique

(ō-blēk′, ə-blēk′)
adj.
Anatomy Situated in a slanting position; not transverse or longitudinal: oblique muscles or ligaments.
n.
An oblique thing, such as a line, direction, or muscle.

o·blique′ly adv.
o·blique′ness n.

oblique

[əblēk′]
Etymology: L, obliquus, slanted
a slanting direction or any variation from the perpendicular or the horizontal.

oblique

Imaging
adjective An MRI term referring to a plane or section not perpendicular to the XYZ co-ordinate system (e.g., long and short axis views of the heart).
 
Medspeak
adjective Slanted; neither horizontal nor vertical.

ob·lique

(ō-blēk')
1. Slanting; deviating from the perpendicular, horizontal, sagittal, or coronal plane of the body.
2. radiography A projection that is neither frontal nor lateral.
[L. obliquus]

oblique

slanted, i.e. non-perpendicular or non-horizontal, and non-parallel to the cardinal body planes

ob·lique

(ō-blēk')
1. Slanting; deviating from perpendicular, horizontal, sagittal, or coronal plane of body.
2. In radiography, projection that is neither frontal nor lateral.
[L. obliquus]

oblique

slanting; inclined.
References in periodicals archive ?
All the species, including the oyster, exhibited this type of obliqueness for the phasic adductor (Fig.
Chacel's rendering of consciousness in Memorias de Leticia Valle reveals the development of Modernism in the decades following the publication of Baroja's Camino de perfeccion, notably through the novel's demonstration of narative obliqueness and destabilisation, self-referentiality, and the fusion of theme with the pursuit of new and original form.
This is a waste because it has much to interest us beyond its mild exoticism and the odd circumstances of its writing and publication, for example the author's fine ear for the 'Guernsey English' in which the fictional autobiography is written, the obliqueness of Edwards's use of narrative voice, and the profound insight into island life and personal failure.
Even amid the ideological constraints of the 1950s and 1960s Synge, unlike Joyce or Yeats, was not considered to be a suspicious author for deviating from realism and displaying notable stylistic obliqueness.
I have to say there were things about it I liked - its obliqueness, its effortless flitting between Victorian and contemporary domestic conflicts - but there were still elements unresolved, matters undeveloped, ultimately no real dramatic thrust.
9) This indirectness of approach, this obliqueness is what characterises the best work of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, and appositely, seems to be what gives the biography its power, as it stands before the mythmaking, allowing the Nick Cave/Bad Seeds phenomenon to be its own performative.
This kind of opposition is hard to measure; and its obliqueness makes it particularly hard to challenge.
Also, I raise the question of Wheatley's obliqueness, here as well as elsewhere in her poetry, such as in "Farewell to America," a poem written on the occasion for a visit to London, where recently laws had been enacted that slaves who had run away from their American masters while in England did not have to be returned to slavery.
You are young', Adam begins, with what is later realized to be characteristic obliqueness,
Baker returned to the big screen in 1967 with Hammer's thought provoking science fiction drama, Quatermass and the Pit, and Mayer has a fine section on The Vampire Lovers (1970), a version of a Sheridan Le Fanu novel that the director managed, against the odds, to invest with some classic obliqueness and poetry when the producers had rather hoped for a lesbian exploitation flick.
The outcomes of the dissipation of the origin include more than a mere obliqueness and insufficiency of the historical knowledge; they also, and necessarily, politicize historical dynamics.
Contemporary poetry's relative antinarrativity, its frequent obliqueness and opaqueness, its "inaudibleness" (which I take to mean its dislocated musicality), its usual lack of manifest sociopolitical engagement--all these factors have contributed to a mutual retreat of writer and reader.