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oblique

 [o-blēk´]
slanting; inclined.

ob·lique

(ob-lēk'),
Slanting; deviating from the perpendicular, horizontal, sagittal, or coronal plane of the body. In radiography, a projection that is neither frontal nor lateral.
[L. obliquus]

oblique

(ō-blēk′, ə-blēk′)
adj.
Anatomy Situated in a slanting position; not transverse or longitudinal: oblique muscles or ligaments.
n.
An oblique thing, such as a line, direction, or muscle.

o·blique′ly adv.
o·blique′ness n.

oblique

[əblēk′]
Etymology: L, obliquus, slanted
a slanting direction or any variation from the perpendicular or the horizontal.

oblique

Imaging
adjective An MRI term referring to a plane or section not perpendicular to the XYZ co-ordinate system (e.g., long and short axis views of the heart).
 
Medspeak
adjective Slanted; neither horizontal nor vertical.

ob·lique

(ō-blēk')
1. Slanting; deviating from the perpendicular, horizontal, sagittal, or coronal plane of the body.
2. radiography A projection that is neither frontal nor lateral.
[L. obliquus]

oblique

slanted, i.e. non-perpendicular or non-horizontal, and non-parallel to the cardinal body planes

ob·lique

(ō-blēk')
1. Slanting; deviating from perpendicular, horizontal, sagittal, or coronal plane of body.
2. In radiography, projection that is neither frontal nor lateral.
[L. obliquus]

oblique

slanting; inclined.
References in periodicals archive ?
ACTRESS Sharon Stone has defended model Kate Moss, saying it is not "that dramatic of a deal to fail, to make a mistake," and she obliquely criticised companies that stopped contracting the model over her alleged cocaine use.
Until now, desirable job-related competencies (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) have been obliquely used as characteristics in lieu of personality assessments.
Both delegations also voiced strong support for continuing to be part of the Anglican Communion, obliquely referring to right-wing opinion that the churches be expelled and left-wing opinion that they leave.
Karmel addresses this point obliquely in her novel when she writes about "the ever-present laws against 'Rassenschande,' the pollution of the race through contact with Jews" (177); here, Karmel leaves the German word (roughly, "defilement of the race") unglossed and makes no overt mention of sexual relations.
obliquely acknowledged the bureaucracy-driven windfall FTAA would create in an October 19, 2004 letter to a constituent: "I have been working along with the Georgia Congressional delegation and the governor to bring the FTAA Headquarters to Atlanta because it is expected to create 27,000 new jobs and $500 million in extra income for the State of Georgia.
enhance my branding and I encourage these (as I obliquely infer in my editorial), but how am I supposed to stay in business if I give my "product" away?
Even in London, Ontario, a Muslim professor and freelance journalist, who spoke out more obliquely but in somewhat the same vein, received death threats and has had to discontinue attending the local mosque.
And what I like to do is to write a kind of series of stories, literally, and then obliquely write one or two lines about those separate stories, then string them together so that there isn't any meaning.
Alpinestars is Manchester (England) duo Glyn Thomas and Richie Woolgar, who describe their inspirations obliquely.
The federal Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) of 1997 obliquely admitted that our society's child welfare system is bankrupt.
And so the murder investigation and manhunt become a quest to uncover the mystery of the Grail, and our protagonists soon discover that they are not looking for a golden cup but for a person whose story and identity have been buried far beneath the surface of Christianity's official teachings, a person whose importance to Christ and early Christianity is suppressed and distorted by tradition and only hinted at obliquely in Christian art and legend.
DuRocher responds to the question obliquely by suggesting that, like Augustine, Milton felt that "the value of the pagan material far outweighs any danger of contamination from it" (159).