objective

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objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

/ob·jec·tive/ (ob-jek´tiv)
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a result for whose achievement an effort is made.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope (or telescope) nearest the object that is being examined.

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.

objective

[əbjek′tiv]
Etymology: L, objectare, to set against
1 n, a goal.
2 adj, pertaining to a phenomenon or clinical finding that is observed; not subjective. An objective finding is often described in health care as a sign that can be seen, heard, felt, or measured.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.

objective,

adj easily observed and measured such that psychological and subjective factors have little influence on measurement.

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.

immersion objective
one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
References in periodicals archive ?
In its methodological determination, it is the reverse of the philosopher's analysis: whereas the analysis differentiates the logical moments of the process of objectivization, the concept of energy gives a dynamic to the concept of symbolic pregnance and underlines the unity of the syntheses.
99) The description of this process as self-reflection is often attributed to Hegel, but it is already in Kant (the object--Objekt, that is, involving an objective universal validity, so neither the Etwas [something] or the Ding [thing], nor the undetermined Gegenstand--being, formaliter spectata, an objectivization of principles of the subject) and, for Cassirer, is a Kantian feature, even if he extends this self-reflection (a) beyond the narrow spheres of Kantian objectivity and (b) to content matters, a point that seems Hegelian.
The scientist, who broadens his scope, refusing positivistic reductionist objectivization, has begun to enter the open society, but the scientist must be a philosopher to gain full access; the scientist must ask the genuine questions of human existence, relearn his Greek heritage and therefore ask the questions of human existence in a way that befits human existence.
gt;From the viewpoint of his field in the new physics, and contrary to the ambient conformism, he urges us not to give in to the principle of objectivization when we are 'struggling for meaning', to borrow the title of Paulin Hountondji's book.
And so we are seeing a war where one rationality modelled on the hard sciences, which are armed with the principle of objectivization governing experimentation, confronts another rationality, which we must call subjective and which rests, as we see here, on anecdotes, personal stories, that are hard to quantify.
Certainly, the process of "writing the city" in A cidade sitiada and the relationship forged between Lucrecia and Sao Geraldo itself make possible the appearance of a feminine identity which rejects the idea that cities only provide another space for the objectivization of women.
The enterprise of participant objectivization, in the way Bourdieu intends it, is thus expressed in the writing which distinguishes between the "analysis" elicited from the interviewee and that of the sociologist, in this case Bourdieu, obliged to elucidate the dispositions and social positions linked by objective relationships that escape the former's practical knowledge.
A role dependent on a series of elements that were part of what actually happened, and, using the mechanisms of objectivization, symbolization and legitimation that we referred to earlier, were magnified, despite their partial and rare nature, to become the sole reality supporting the collective memory.
What we normally understand by "natural environment" is a thing that has been extracted by objectivization from human mediance, its concrete ground (gutaiteki fiban).
26) That is, in summary, what one could call the stable and ordered side of the system, which means that apprehension, objectivization, and action are on the other side.
At this point in the expose it is necessary to stress that these economic habitus, far from being universal, are culturally determined options, and the social loci of their practical projection, rather than being arbitrarily defined, must flow from a minute study of the frequency and modes of their objectivization.
But this `inner orientation' is not the result of a conceptual objectivization.