nymph


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nymph

 [nimf]
a developmental stage in certain arthropods (e.g., ticks) between the larval form and the adult; it resembles an adult but does not have fully developed wings or genitalia.

nymph

(nimf),
1. The earliest series of stages in metamorphosis following hatching in the development of hemimetabolous insects (for example, locusts); the nymph resembles the adult in many respects, but lacks full wing or genitalia development; it grows through successive instars without any intermediate or pupal stage into the imago or adult form.
See also: incomplete metamorphosis, complete metamorphosis.
2. The third stage in the life cycle of a tick, between the larva and the adult.
[G. nymphē, maiden]

nymph

(nimf) a developmental stage in certain arthropods, e.g., ticks, between the larval form and the adult, and resembling the latter in appearance.

nymph

(nĭmf)
n.
a. The immature form of an insect, such as a grasshopper, that does not pass through a pupal stage during metamorphosis. Nymphs resemble adults but are smaller and lack fully developed wings.
b. The eight-legged immature form of certain arachnids, such as ticks and mites.

nymph′al (nĭm′fəl) adj.

nymph

the immature stages of any EXOPTERYGOTE, such as the mayfly It has compound eyes and mouthparts like the adult, but usually lacks wings (though traces are sometimes present) and is sexually immature. See METAMORPHOSIS, ENDOPTERYGOTE.

nymph

a developmental stage in certain arthropods (e.g. ticks, mites and lice) between the larval form and the adult, and resembling the latter in appearance.
References in classic literature ?
Circe and the four nymphs must have been very diligently at work since the arrival of the mariners; for a great many yards of tapestry had nw been wrought, in addition to what I before described.
But I have omitted to describe the dress worn by this nymph of the valley.
Oh, nymph, who quittest now this grot profound, To admire the greatest king of all kings round.
to those sounds which, in the pleasant mansions of that gate which seems to derive its name from a duplicity of tongues, issue from the mouths, and sometimes from the nostrils, of those fair river nymphs, ycleped of old the Naiades; in the vulgar tongue translated oyster-wenches; for when, instead of the antient libations of milk and honey and oil, the rich distillation from the juniper-berry, or, perhaps, from malt, hath, by the early devotion of their votaries, been poured forth in great abundance, should any daring tongue with unhallowed license prophane,
Cropole, to make amends to his painter-in-ordinary, hung up the nymphs of the preceding sign in his bedroom, which made Madame Cropole blush every time she looked at it, when she was undressing at night.
Last eve in dreams, I saw thee stand, Like queenly nymphs from Fairy-land-- Enchantress of the flowery wand, Most beauteous Isadore!
Let anti-masques not be long; they have been commonly of fools, satyrs, baboons, wild-men, antics, beasts, sprites, witches, Ethiops, pigmies, turquets, nymphs, rustics, Cupids, statuas moving, and the like.
I adored indiscriminately all the tribes of nymphs and naiads, demigods and heroes, as well as the high ones of Olympus; and I am afraid that by day I dwelt in a world peopled and ruled by them, though I faithfully said my prayers at night, and fell asleep in sorrow for my sins.
When this happened the ancient world was rolled up like a scroll, and put away until the next day, with all its orators and conspirators, its nymphs and satyrs, gods and demigods; though sometimes they escaped at night and got into the boy's dreams.
And at a stately sideboard, by the wine, That fragrant smell diffused, in order stood Tall stripling youths rich-clad, of fairer hue Than Ganymed or Hylas; distant more, Under the trees now tripped, now solemn stood, Nymphs of Diana's train, and Naiades With fruits and flowers from Amalthea's horn, And ladies of the Hesperides, that seemed Fairer than feigned of old, or fabled since Of faery damsels met in forest wide By knights of Logres, or of Lyones, Lancelot, or Pelleas, or Pellenore.
Village nymphs strewed flowers on the path to the church door
If Drayton were with us again to write a new edition of his incomparable poem, he would sing the nymphs of Hertfordshire as indeterminate of feature, with hair obfuscated by the London smoke.