nutrient density


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nutrient density

the relative ratio obtained by dividing a food's contribution to the needs for a nutrient by its contribution to calorie needs.

nutrient density

The ratio of the nutrients present in a food relative to its caloric value.
See also: density
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Few studies have been done to examine the effect of lighting schedule by nutrient density interaction on carcass traits and meat quality in broiler chickens.
But even granting the many gaps in our knowledge of nutrient and health interactions, reducing the nutrient density of our whole foods seems a poor public health gamble.
The issue of nutritional equivalence and nutrient density is of particular importance in energy-restricted diets where there is a need to choose nutrient-dense options.
Prepare to observe some or all of the phenomena such as stronger, more productive plants, fewer insects, less plant pathogens, higher tolerance to variable conditions like cold or drought, increased nutrient density, and the best tasting produce ever
Department of Agriculture not to limit servings of potatoes, corn, peas and lima beans in school meals and to retain the current nutrient density classification for tomato paste.
With a mild taste and subtle earthy flavor, Maca can boost nutrient density in a variety of foods, from baked goods to soups.
Almonds This is a wonderful snack to have around at all times, both for its nutrient density and protein content.
Nutrient density (high in vitamins, fiber), is a far better measure for health.
This includes saturated and unsaturated fats, vegetable and animal proteins, gluten and nongluten grains, and all varieties of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds--all as toxin-free and sustainably produced as possible, and all prepared by methods that ensure the greatest nutrient density and ease of digestion.
For one, although the Dietary Guidelines statement on organic foods references only limited research on nutrient density, it draws the broad conclusion that "Our current understanding of conventional and organically produced foods indicate that their nutritional value and contributions to human health are similar.
Complementary foods in developing countries are mainly made from starchy staples, which when cooked with water, become viscous and bulky with low energy and nutrient density [7].