nutrient


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Related to nutrient: vitamin, Carbohydrates, nutrient agar, Nutrient cycle

nutrient

 [noo´tre-ent]
1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a food or biochemical substance used by the body that must be supplied in adequate amounts from foods consumed. There are six classes of nutrients: water, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt),
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient

/nu·tri·ent/ (noo´tre-int)
1. nourishing; providing nutrition.
2. a food or other substance that provides energy or building material for the survival and growth of a living organism.

nutrient

(no͞o′trē-ənt, nyo͞o′-)
n.
A source of nourishment, especially a nourishing ingredient in a food.
adj.
Providing nourishment.

nutrient

[no̅o̅′trē·ənt]
Etymology: L, nutriens, food that nourishes
a chemical substance that provides nourishment and affects the nutritive and metabolic processes of the body. Nutrients are essential for growth, reproduction, and maintenance of health.

nutrient

Food industry
A substance added to foods that increases their vitamin, mineral and/or protein content.

nutrient

Food industry A substance added to foods to ↑ vitamin, mineral and protein content Nutrition A general term for proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, necessary for growth and maintenance of life. See Food additive, Macronutrient, Micronutrient.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient

Anything that nourishes. Any physiologically valuable ingredient in food.

nutrient

any material that organisms take in and assimilate for growth and maintenance.

Nutrient

A food substance that provides energy or is necessary for growth and repair. Examples of nutrients are vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

nutrient

a component of food that can be used to provide energy and/or in the synthesis of substances necessary for metabolism, growth and repair, and for all physiological functions (e.g. coenzymes, hormones, haemoglobin). See also macronutrients, micronutrients, minerals, vitamins; appendix 4.1-4.4 .

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
Constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient,

n the beneficial chemical in foods and beverages. Classified as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, vitamins, and minerals.

nutrient

1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a nourishing substance, food or component of food. Includes minerals, vitamins, fats, protein, carbohydrate and water.

nutrient allowance
the total feed provided to an animal for a day. Includes its basic nutritional requirements plus allowances for waste in the feeding process, special allowances for special states and activities, and for special qualities of the feed being used.
nutrient analysis
chemical analysis of feedstuff with measurement of fiber, protein, fat, carbohydrate, individual minerals and vitamins.
nutrient artery
one of the arterial blood supplies to a typical long bone; enters the bone via an oblique canal. Other blood supply routes to bone include metaphyseal, epiphyseal and periosteal arteries.
nutrient content
the proportion of a feed or diet that is digestible and assimilable. See also total digestible nutrients.
nutrient profile
a listing of the optimal level of each nutrient in dog and cat foods; published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials.
nutrient requirements
daily requirement for each nutrient for each animal species at the recognized stages of life and production; usually presented in feeding tables.
nutrient veins
mimics the nutrient artery.
References in periodicals archive ?
The laboratory is part of the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center and provides free electronic access to the National Nutrient Database via the World Wide Web.
This BlueTech Insight Report focuses on advanced nutrient removal and recovery technologies.
Although the tendency is to rate foods based on a few nutrients, these techniques can also rate food quality based on the total nutrient package: protein, fiber, vitamins, minerals and multiple micronutrients, and not just fat, sugar and salt.
Providing information on over 700 commonly prescribed drugs known to deplete the body of its natural nutrients, Nutrient Depletions gives easy-to-use recommendations on nutrient replenishment.
A claim that describes the level of antioxidant nutrients present in a food is a nutrient content claim and may be used on the label or in the labeling of a food when the conditions of use in the regulation are met (21 CFR 101.
Many of Australia's cropping soils are old and leached, and do not naturally contain the level of nutrients needed to now sustain high-intensity cropping systems with high rates of nutrient removal in grain and fodder.
They show the amount of energy or an individual nutrient that a group of people of a certain age range (and sometimes sex) needs for good health.
They supply plants with plenty of nutrients for growth, will not burn sensitive plants and seedlings, and will remain in the soil for weeks
Coastal resources have traditionally been monitored on a stressor-by-stressor basis such as for nutrient loading or dissolved oxygen.
SRM 2387 is the first food-matrix reference material available from NIST with values assigned for amino acids, making the material potentially useful as a quality assurance tool for these and other nutrients in USDA's nutrient databases.
The ecological engineering group's research includes investigation of the response of aquatic systems to nutrient enrichment from diffuse and point sources, control of biotic and abiotic processes on water quality and in the landscape for enhanced ecological services, and combining these investigations to enhance ecosystem management and develop decision support systems.