nursing orders

nursing orders

specific instructions for implementing the nursing care plan, including the patient's preferences, timing of activities, details of health education necessary for the particular patient, role of the family, and plans for care after discharge. Nursing orders must be signed by the professional nurse who writes them. They should not duplicate the orders of the medical staff or of other members of the health team.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unsung reformers like Mary Jones developed autonomous, self-funded Anglican nursing orders, providing "respectable" trained nurses to London hospitals.
This will need to be balanced with the tendency to make too many of the orders into nursing orders so as to shift this burden to nursing.
They did not use a Kardex[R]; nursing orders and protocols were unheard of.
Nursing orders may include allowing family 24-hour visitation and discontinuing all invasive monitoring, nasogastric tubes, laboratory testing, and central venous access catheters, while leaving one venous access for administration of intravenous (IV) medications.
One of the staff members I supervise recently told me that it would be really helpful for her to know what my schedule would be each week, beyond my regular clinic times, so she could tell patients how soon she would be able to catch up with me to sign nursing orders or write a prescription.
In part, this is an association with the Christian tradition and religious nursing orders, who have embraced society's disenfranchised and cared for all, no matter how "worthy" or "unworthy" they might seem.
The protocols set the standard for care, provide a wonderful reference and teaching tool for the nurse, and serve as the nursing orders to define the plan of care for the patient.
Today, we have all data for ED patients contained in ibex Pulsecheck--lab orders and results, nursing orders, X-ray orders and physician documentation.
Nursing orders, in particular, had served as major purveyors of medical practice and prescription before doctors displaced them.
The small-town hospitals had several things going for them: the terms of their foundation, which made diversion of their revenues challengeable in law; the protection of local elites, who derived interest and status from managing them; the very real improvements in care which the new female nursing orders introduced; and finally, late in the day, the recognition by crown ministers such as Turgot and Necker that the care of the poor and sick was best left in local hands.
They outline interventions and contributions used for documentation and outcome evaluation, deviations, nursing orders, and education for the entire health care team (Crummer k Carter,
The Revolution changed patients' hospital experience by expanding the role of medical students, dissolving the religious nursing orders (no doubt the most ill-advised of the new measures), modernizing and regularizing the pharmacopoeia available, and in the case of maternity patients, transforming a former religous house in Paris into an up-to-date lying-in hospital and midwifery school.