nurse's aide

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nurse's aide

(nûr′sĭz)
n. pl. nurses' aides
A person who assists nurses at a hospital or other medical facility with basic tasks, such as bathing and dressing patients.

nurse's aide

a person who is employed to carry out basic nonspecialized tasks in the care of patients, such as bathing and feeding, making beds, and transporting patients, under the supervision and direction of a registered nurse. Many hospitals offer education and orientation programs for newly hired nurse's aides and inservice education for continued training.

nurse's aide

, nurse aide,

NA

An individual who assists nurses by performing the patient-care procedures that do not require special technical training, such as feeding and bathing patients.

nurse's aide,

n a person who is employed to carry out basic nonspecialized tasks in the care of a patient, such as bathing and feeding, making beds, and transporting patients under the supervision and direction of a registered nurse.
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