nudibranch

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nudibranch

a member of the order Nudibranchia, gasteropod molluscs which lack a shell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Burn is both an amateur seashore naturalist and internationally respected authority on nudibranchs and related molluscs--an encouraging example showing that anyone with sufficient interest and enthusiasm can make a valuable contribution to scientific knowledge.
Our observations in 2014 and early 2015 of nudibranchs and other sea slugs in long-term intertidal study sites in southern and central California, combined with dive reports from southern California, and posts on various photo and observation-sharing websites, indicated that similar range shifts and increases in abundance of southern species of sea slugs were occurring again in California.
Home to a marine extravaganza as diverse and vibrant as it is unique, the Inner Islands boast an abundance of marine life including butterflyfish, angelfish, soldierfish and squirrelfish among others and reefs that feature octopus, spiny lobster and a plethora of nudibranchs.
The sea slugs are nudibranchs, which means besides possessing both male and female reproductive organs, they could use both at the same time.
Indo-Pacific Nudibranchs and Sea Slugs: A Field Guide to the World's Most Diverse Fauna.
To provide more information on embryonic development, 19 adult nudibranchs ranging in length from 1.
They share the ocean with well over a hundred species of jellyfish and a diversity of seaweeds, deep-water corals, and nudibranchs.
Countless organisms--mollusks, crustaceans, worms, fish, starfish, jellyfish, sluglike nudibranchs, algae, anemones, urchins and many more--flourish within an environment enriched by oxygenated water and literally awash in food; each species is both predator and prey.
A giant stride from the dive centre, the house reef is teeming with macro life, including ghost pipefish, seahorses and psychedelic nudibranchs (sea slugs).
ALSO LOOK FOR rockfish, glowing opalescent nudibranchs, purple urchins, 2-foot-long sea cucumbers, and neon-bright blood stars.