nuclei


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Related to nuclei: Condensation nuclei

nuclei

 [noo´kle-i] (L.)
plural of nucleus.

nu·cle·i

(nū'klē-ī),
Plural of nucleus.

nuclei

/nu·clei/ (noo´kle-i) [L.] plural of nucleus.

nuclei

(no͞o′klē-ī′, nyo͞o′-)
n.
A plural of nucleus.

nucleus

[n(y)o̅o̅′klē·əs] pl. nuclei
Etymology: L, nut kernel
1 the central controlling body within a living cell, usually a spheric unit enclosed in a membrane and containing genetic codes for maintaining life systems of the organism and for issuing commands for growth and reproduction.
2 a group of nerve cells of the central nervous system having a common function, such as supporting the sense of hearing or smell.
3 the center of an atom consisting of an element-specific number of protons and neutrons. A probability cloud of electrons exists around the atomic nucleus.
4 the central element in an organic chemical compound or class of compounds. Formerly called cytoblast. -nuclear, adj.
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Nucleus

nu·cle·i

(nū'klē-ī)
Plural of nucleus.

nuclei

plural of nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than aligning one spin in a million as standard NMR does, this processes aligns the spins of almost one in three xenon nuclei.
The researchers hypothesized that these abnormalities may result from incomplete remodeling of the donor cell nuclei and/or from mis-regulation of expression of differentiated cell-specific genes.
So, nuclear physicists are turning to unstable, radioactive nuclei.
The relative ease of quasi-fission may mean that would-be fusions of two nuclei into superheavy elements don't occur.
Since apoferritin is roughly spherical, it therefore ought to form spherical nuclei as well.
Knowing these temperatures will make it possible to better identify the stages that nuclei pass through as they crumble from an orderly arrangement of nucleons into a disorderly high-energy gas, says Magne Guttormsen, who led the research team.
During more than a half-century of making increasingly proton-laden nuclei, scientists have found that such nuclei generally decay sooner than lighter ones.
In the first study, scientists genetically engineered mice to have the mutant gene responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), one of the diseases in which mutant proteins clump inside cells' nuclei.
It is difficult to attribute these bands of condensation nuclei to particular planes because the Federal Aviation Administration doesn't keep records long enough to be useful to the researchers, says Hofmann.
By determining the rate at which the unstable nuclei of two elements emit protons, researchers have for the first time obtained experimental evidence that these particular nuclei look more like flattened globes than true spheres.
Resurrecting that long-forgotten observation, Bates and her colleagues have studied mice genetically engineered to develop Huntington's disease and now report that the mutant proteins they produce aggregate in the nuclei of some brain cells.
In 1952, scientists working with frogs transferred nuclei into unfertilized eggs whose own nuclei had been removed.