nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio

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nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio

, nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio
The proportion of a nucleated blood cell occupied by the nucleus. In white blood cells, the larger the nucleus (relative to the cytoplasm), the more immature the cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cells have a relatively high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio and hyperchromatic nuclei (figure 2).
The neoplastic cells have a very high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, with nuclei that are delicate and prone to crush artifacts.
Examination of the patient's peripheral blood sample on the first day post partum revealed the presence of numerous blast cells with high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, irregular nuclei, finely reticular chromatin, and 1 to 4 nucleoli (Figure 1, A and B).
Despite the more mature cytoplasmic features, the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio was disproportionately high and many of the dysplastic nuclei still exhibited 1 or 2 indistinct nucleoli.
The cells had a high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, and profiles of intermediate filaments were prevalent in the cytoplasm of the cells (Figure 2B,C).
The cells are slightly enlarged, and there is a high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, very little maturation toward the surface, and at least a few areas of loss of polarity (figure 2).
enlarged cells with a high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio
Morphologically, the neoplasm is characterized by monotonous sheets of hyperchromatic cells with round-to-oval nuclei, high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratios, and scant cytoplasm.
Histopathologically, high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratios, prominent nucleoli, more reticular (less clumped, "clock-face"--appearing chromatin), and the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions are signs of cytologic irregularity indicative of malignancy rather than plasma-cell reactivity.