nuclear


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to nuclear: Nuclear war, Nuclear weapons, Nuclear stress test

nuclear

 [noo´kle-ar]
pertaining to a nucleus.
nuclear magnetic resonance a phenomenon exhibited by many atomic nuclei: when placed in a constant magnetic field, the nuclei absorb electromagnetic radiation at a few characteristic frequencies. By applying an external magnetic field to a solution in a constant radio frequency field, it is possible to determine the structure of an unknown compound. An application of this technique, called magnetic resonance imaging, permits imaging of soft tissues of the body by distinguishing between hydrogen atoms in different environments.
nuclear medicine technologist a health care professional whose duties include positioning and attending to patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures, operating imaging devices (scintillation cameras and rectilinear scanners) under the direction of the nuclear medicine physician, preparing radiopharmaceuticals for administration to patients, making dose calculations for in vivo procedures, performing quality control procedures, and utilizing a knowledge of radiation physics and radiation safety to minimize the radiation exposure to patients, to the technologist and coworkers, and to the public. There are currently three organizations that certify nuclear medicine technologists: the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP), and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Individuals certified by the ARRT are designated RT(N)(ARRT); those certified by the ASCP are designated NM(ASCP); and those certified by the NMTCB are designated CNMT.

nu·cle·ar

(nū'klē-ĕr), Avoid the mispronunciation nū'kyu-lar.
Relating to a nucleus, either cellular or atomic; in the latter sense, usually referring to radiation emanating from atomic nuclei (α, β, or γ) or to atomic fission.

nuclear

/nu·cle·ar/ (noo´kle-ar) pertaining to a nucleus.

nuclear

(no͞o′klē-ər, nyo͞o′-)
adj.
1. Biology Of, relating to, or forming a nucleus of a cell: a nuclear membrane.
2. Physics
a. Of or relating to atomic nuclei: a nuclear chain reaction.
b. Using or derived from the energy of atomic nuclei: nuclear power.
3. Of, using, or possessing atomic or hydrogen bombs: nuclear war; nuclear nations.
4. Drastic or extreme; radical: "The Senate majority leader ... had vowed to invoke what some have called the nuclear option to do away with judicial filibusters" (Carl Hulse).

nu·cle·ar

(nū'klē-ăr)
Relating to a nucleus, either cellular or atomic; in the latter sense, usually referring to radiation emanating from atomic nuclei (α, β, or γ) or to atomic fission.

nuclear

pertaining to a nucleus.

nuclear bag fibers
fibers found in neuromuscular spindles; have an extensive nerve supply.
nuclear chain fibers
fibers, which like nuclear bag fibers, are found in neuromuscular spindles; shorter but more numerous than the bag variety.
nuclear ground substance, nuclear matrix
the matrix substance in a nucleus, surrounded by the limiting membrane.
nuclear imaging
nuclear index
nuclear medicine technologist
see radiological technologist.
nuclear sap
soluble phase of the nuclear matrix.
nuclear veterinary medicine
see nuclear veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Observing that the fire rendered all safety equipment inoperative and that thick smoke, loss of control over the reactor, and "inadequate breathing apparatuses" interfered with the operators' attempts to save the plant, the paper sums up the event in these words: "TVA nuclear engineers stated privately to the authors that a potentially catastrophic radiation release from Browns Ferry was avoided by 'sheet luck.
We actually have a contingency plan" in case of a nuclear emergency, he says.
In another part of the country, New York's Westchester and Suffolk counties and the state of New Jersey have appropriated funds to study areas near nuclear plants where cancer clusters are suspected.
Images of children recur throughout Original Child Bomb: period footage of smiling Japanese children, taken from the McGovern Collection in Washington, DC, interspersed with filmed portraits of Hiroshima youth today; American schoolchildren in conversation; a child rehearsing her ABCs in terms related to nuclear warfare ("'A' is for atom; 'B' is for bomb; 'C' is for Cold War").
First, it sets a dangerous precedent for other nuclear powers to justify using aggressive preventive force to settle international disputes.
The current combination of nuclear proliferation, political instability, and urban demographics "forms perhaps the greatest danger to the stability of human society since the dawn of man," warns Toon.
The broader issue is concern over the growing number of nuclear powers: The more countries that have nuclear weapons, the bigger the risks for the world at large--especially when these weapons end up in the hands of nations that might sell them to terrorists.
Currently, a scenario in which terrorists could successfully storm a facility, gain access to the nuclear materials, and have enough time to set off an IND appears highly unlikely, but not impossible.
Then the mullahs pulled back their troops and the president of Iran announced the dismantlement of the country's nuclear arms (see related story).
The potential for building new nuclear power plants is quite different in different countries.
The Bush administration claims it can develop new nukes without lowering the overall threshold for the use of nuclear weapons, but that strategic doublethink doesn't last long under an analytical microscope.