normative

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nor·ma·tive

(nōr'mă-tiv),
Pertaining to the normal or usual.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to Boff, liberation theologians from a multi-religious context in which classics of other religions are widely read tend to deny the normativeness of the Christian Scriptures.
Kant's subject-constitutive a priori exhibits a performative dynamism as "the normativeness that is immanent within the subject and through which the subject promotes step by step the content of sensation into known reality"; it is "the a priori according to which the subject questions the object" (121).
I believe Ferrara would have to concede that some of the earliest arguments for restricting the priesthood to men rely precisely on the normativeness of Christ's call of the Twelve.
Back in Canada for a period of teaching at Loyola College in Montreal, Lonergan read the early dialogues of Plato, in which he appreciated the methodology of questioning and the normativeness of intelligence.
32) Since the finality and normativeness of Jesus are based on the "distinctive structure of existence" or "field of force" achieved by him, I would argue that Cobb's Logos Christology is constitutive as well as normative.
Judgments about claims to uniqueness or normativeness are unverifiable and therefore lacking in basis.
The Christian claim to uniqueness and normativeness is based on the doctrine of the Incarnation which, according to Hick, is mythical and needs reinterpretation.
My thesis is that if one holds seriously the normativeness of Christ, one must also admit Christ's constitutive significance for salvation.
And the same must be said, I believe, of attempts to justify the maleness of the priest by appealing to the normativeness of Christ's call of the Twelve.