approximation

(redirected from normal approximation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to normal approximation: normal distribution, Central limit theorem

approximation

 [ah-prok″sĭ-ma´shun]
1. the act or process of bringing into proximity or apposition.
2. a numerical value of limited accuracy.
successive approximation shaping.

ap·prox·i·ma·tion

(ă-prok'si-mā'shŭn),
In surgery, bringing tissue edges into desired apposition for suturing.

approximation

/ap·prox·i·ma·tion/ (ah-prok″sĭ-ma´shun)
1. the act or process of bringing into proximity or apposition.
2. a numerical value of limited accuracy.

ap·prox·i·ma·tion

(ă-prok'si-mā'shŭn)
In surgery, bringing tissue edges into desired apposition for suturing.

approximation

surgical apposition of wound edges in preparation for suture insertion

approximation,

n a massage technique in which muscle fibers are pressed together along the direction of the fibers in order to relieve cramping.

approximation

1. the act or process of bringing into proximity or apposition.
2. a numerical value of limited accuracy.

normal approximation
approximation of the actual distribution of a variable by a normal distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shao (2004), Normal approximation under local dependence, Ann.
Yukich (2005), Normal approximation in geometric probability, in Stein's Method and Applications, Lecture Note Series, Institute for Mathematical Sciences, National University of Singapore, 5, A.
This argument involves a rather coarse discretization of the unit cube so as to use a result of (5) on normal approximation for k-dependent random fields.
1 reduces the problem of finding normal approximations to finding bounds on the variance and third moments.
The normal approximation gives probabilities in the correct range almost all the time for p-values of less than .
In comparing the Poisson and normal approximation approaches, the latter seem preferable.
The Z-score and probability calculation for the normal approximation is quite simple and its cost is roughly proportional to the number of patients.
Both the standard rule of thumb and our examination of the normal approximation results suggest that the normal approximation is reasonable when the number of expected deaths is five or more.
In contrast, 83 percent to 87 percent of all hospital-years could use the normal approximation for pneumonia, stroke, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and CABG patients.