nonabandonment

nonabandonment

(non?a-ban'dun-ment)
The ethical obligation of a health care provider to remain in a continuous caring partnership with his or her patient. This partnership remains in place during periods of health and illness and is particularly important when the patient has a chronic or life-threatening disease. Several aspects of modern medical care, in which the patient's choice of physician may be limited and disrupt the continuity of the physician-patient relationship, make carrying out this obligation difficult.
See: abandonment
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in an abandonment case about oysters, the fact that the oysters were surrounded by stakes should have signaled their nonabandonment to the fisherman who took them.
They begin to explore the reasons behind the request, intensify efforts to relieve pain and suffering, consult specialists for relief of psychological or spiritual suffering, commit to nonabandonment, and seek mutually acceptable solutions for the patient's suffering (Schwarz, 2014).
The strict nonparticipation option they discuss is very hard to explain in terms of the ethical tension between autonomy and good dying because the promise of steadfast presence and nonabandonment is a core tenet of the hospice philosophy of the good.
Thiessen's volume, on God's nonabandonment of Israel, works meticulously through chapters nine to eleven of Romans; the relation of "believing heathens" to the New Covenant, which is addressed basically to Israel rather than to them; the promised Reign of God; and the 1,000-year kingdom of Revelation.
Certainly, simple duty alone requires the nonabandonment in her hour of need of the one who gave birth to and raised you.
corollary to the assumption of nonabandonment and has been applied
Part one contains the primary case for assisted suicide, based on the principles of mercy, autonomy, and nonabandonment.
For example, the value of nonabandonment implies certain enduring commitments to patients and families.
Doctors must therefore be constantly attentive if they are to act in the best interest of the patient and be trustworthy in fulfilling critical commitments to care at the end of life-attending to pain and suffering, nonabandonment, and communicating with patients and families in ways that truly enable informed decision-making and uphold personal autonomy.
They argue that nonabandonment is especially important in specialized care involving children.
The norm of nonabandonment is relevant not only to whether physician-assisted death may be legitimate but also to how it should be performed.