nomenclature

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nomenclature

 [no´men-kla″chur]
terminology; a classified system of technical names, such as of anatomical structures or organisms.
binomial nomenclature the nomenclature used in scientific classification of living organisms in which each organism is designated by two latinized names (genus and species), both of which must always be used because species names are not necessarily unique. note: The genus name is always capitalized, the species name is not, and both are italicized, e.g., Escherichia coli. When a name is repeated the genus name may be abbreviated by its initial, e.g., E. coli.

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'men-klā'chūr, nō-men'klă-chūr),
A system of names, as of anatomic structures, molecular entities, or organisms, used in any science.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature

/no·men·cla·ture/ (no´men-kla″cher) a classified system of names, as of anatomical structures, organisms, etc.
binomial nomenclature  the system of designating plants and animals by two latinized words signifying the genus and species.

nomenclature

(nō′mən-klā′chər, nō-mĕn′klə-)
n.
1. A system of names used in an art or science: the nomenclature of mineralogy.
2. The system or procedure of assigning names to groups of organisms as part of a taxonomic classification: the rules of nomenclature in botany.

no′men·cla′tur·al adj.

nomenclature

[nō′mənklā′chər, nōmen′-]
Etymology: L, nomen, name, clamare, to call
a consistent, systematic method of naming used in a scientific discipline to denote classifications and avoid ambiguities in names, such as binomial nomenclature in biology and chemical nomenclature in chemistry.

nomenclature

Any naming convention based on principles delineated and accepted by an official committee or body—e.g., the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC), the Enzyme Commission of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB), etc.
 
Alternative medicine
The names used in alternative healthcare often overlap with those of mainstream medicine, as well as other fields, and may cause confusion to the practitioners of both types of medicine, as well as to patients. For example, colonic irrigation is used by mainstream practitioners for the flushing of the large intestine in preparation for emergency surgery, and used by alternative practitioners as a synonym for colon therapy, the practice of performing multiple enemas to flush out putative toxins.

Science-speak
Any system for assigning names to a particular structure.

nomenclature

Any system for assigning names to a particular structure. See Binomial nomenclature, Classification, SNOMED, SNOP, Taxonomy Alternative medicine The names used in alternative health care often overlap with those of mainstream medicine and other fields and may confuse practitioners of both types of medicine, as well as Pts.
Nomenclature–alternative medical term–sources of confusion
Different uses for same term Eg, colonic irrigation is used in mainstream medicine for flushing the colon in preparation for emergency surgery, and in alternative health as a synonym for colon therapy, the practice of performing multiple enemas to flush out putative toxins; similarly, herbologists use the same names for medicinal plants as used by horticulturists, which may or may not refer to the same plants; Example: geranium for ornamental use and for medicinal use
Different terms for the same entity Eg, homeopaths use a latinized term, Natrum muriaticum, for table salt–sodium chloride; similarly, some herbs are known by the trivial name, eg, rue, and blood root, while the homeopathic remedies based on these same plants take the Latin name, Ruta, and Sanguinaria, respectively

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'mĕn-klā-chŭr)
A set system of names used in any science, as of anatomic structures, organisms, and other classifications.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature

A system of names used in a science or other discipline.

nomenclature

see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE.

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'mĕn-klā-chŭr)
A set system of names used in any science, as of anatomic structures, organisms, and other classifications.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature (nō´menklā´chur),

n the formally adopted terminology of a science, art, or discipline; the system of names or terms used in a particular branch of science.
nomenclature, anatomic,
n a naming system used to identify and classify the structures and organs of the body.

nomenclature

terminology; a classified system of technical names, as of anatomical structures, organisms, etc.

binomial nomenclature
the system of designating plants and animals by two latinized words signifying the genus and species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nomenclatural note: Gehu & Sadki (1996, not 1995; see Note on the Ephedro fragilis-Junieretum turbinatae) validated the association by selecting the holotype.
Como en casos anteriores, la prioridad nomenclatural asigna el nombre a Johann Hedwig: Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw.
Even though across the United States, there is no common agreement among black studies scholars about unit nomenclatural choices, it would appear that a consensus has emerged around one factor, namely that any black studies project that is conceptually divorced from Africa as a geographical and cultural starting base is a non-starter.
Cuando una determinada especie ha sido transferida a otro genero que no es el original (acto nomenclatural denominado combinacion) el nombre del autor de la descripcion y el ano se colocan entre parentesis.
I use the cladotypic nomenclatural procedure I elaborated (2007b, c; 2010) and Lanham's species names (Dayrat et al.
reniformis conllevaria a un caos nomenclatural innecesario dentro de la clasificacion interna de Aristolochia basada en monofilia, debido a que estas dos especies se encuentran anidadas en los subclados mas diversos del genero, subordinados de la siguiente manera (Fig.
From this work, taking into account synonyms and nomenclatural changes but excluding the accepted subspecific taxa, one can derive another list of the sedges known and reported to occur in Illinois, including 17 genera and 225 species, 138 of which were species of Carex.
Lehrbuch des Naurgeschichte Zoologie [Volume 3, Zoologie, published 1815-1816; International Code Zoological Nomenclature opinion 417-vol 3 rejected for nomenclatural purposes].
Its nomenclatural affinity with political and economic libertarianism (hereafter PEL) is by no means accidental, since, as I am going to argue, the viability of the latter depends on the viability of the former.
In this note we discuss the situation of these problematic Asian species and propose nomenclatural solutions given the information currently available.
By way of linking the poem suggestively to the vanitas tradition (125-30), showing the extent to which the margin notes are more discursively expansive than the concise clarifying, nomenclatural, or indexical marginalia typical of the day (246), and indicting how The Purple Island figurality relates to Harveian anatomy especially as regards the systematic circulation of blood (351), Mitchell clarifies how the poem "develops a highly sophisticated soteriological epistemology and hermeneutics of the 'scientific' and poetic concepts of ingenuity and eloquence, which Fletcher's religious prose shows us is modeled on the operation of the Holy Spirit in ecclesia, which is in turn modeled on the operation of the soul through the heart and brain in the human body" (478).
NOMENCLATURAL REMARKS (based mainly on STEEL, 1973): When establishing Steneosaurus "pour les reptiles fossils connus jusqu'a ce jour sous le nom de Gavials d'Honfleur", GEOFFROY SAINT-HILAIRE (1825) proposed two species, Steneosaurus rostro-major [correct spelling according to ICZN, article 32.