nociceptor


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nociceptor

 [no″se-sep´tor]
a receptor for pain, stimulated by various kinds of tissue injury. adj., adj nocicep´tive.

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr, -tōr),
A peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor

/no·ci·cep·tor/ (-sep´ter) a receptor for pain caused by injury, physical or chemical, to body tissues.nocicep´tive

nociceptor

(nō′sĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to pain.

nociceptor

[nō′sēsep′tər]
a somatic and visceral free nerve ending of thinly myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. It usually reacts to tissue injury but also may be excited by endogenous chemical substances.
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Nociceptors

nociceptor

Pain receptor Neurology Any of a class of periarticular and mucocutaneous sense organs and neural receptors–eg, reflex loops for reception and response to pain; located primarily in the skin or viscera, nociceptors respond to chemical, mechanical, or other stimuli

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr)
A peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor

a receptor in the form of a naked dendrite which reacts in response to a pain stimulus.

Nociceptor

A nerve cell that is capable of sensing pain and transmitting a pain signal.

nociceptor

peripheral nerve ending, specific for appreciation and transmission of painful or noxious stimuli

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr)
Peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor (nō´sisep´tər),

n somatic and visceral free nerve endings of thinly myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. They usually react to tissue injury but also may be excited by endogenous chemical substances.

nociceptor

a receptor that is stimulated by injury; a receptor for pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nociceptors convert the stimuli (which can be mechanical, thermal, or chemical) to electrical signals {transduction), which trigger action potentials.
In particular, scientists believe that nociceptor cells release the peptide to trigger the cord nerve cells that pass pain signals on to the brain.
Inflammatory mediators can both trigger the nociceptors directly and also sensitise them to other stimuli.
Nociceptors are sensitized during inflammation, their ionic properties are altered and their firing characteristics changes.
Not all visceral organs have nociceptor innervation.
The ITT (intent to treat) population was comprised of a mix of subjects in which about half had little or no nociceptor preservation and therefore the pooled results were not significant.
It also remains to be confirmed that proprietary ginger preparations are clinically useful to alleviate osteoarthritic or other pain, although there is no doubt that ginger constituents interfere with the inflammatory cascade and the vanilloid nociceptor.
Duarte LD, dos Santos IR, Lorenzetti BB, Ferreira SH (1992) Analgesia by direct antagonism of nociceptor sensitization involves the arginine-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway.
The licking time of the formalin test showed biphasic responses; the early phase (0-5 min) was mediated by the central effect via direct stimulation of the nociceptor and releasing substane P or bradykinin, and the late phase (15-40 min) was mediated by the peripheral effect via release of some chemical transmitters (e.
These pain-blocking drugs, called "Selective Nociceptor Blockers," have the potential for blocking pain sensation without having side effects due to action in the brain.
1) Pain sensation typically occurs because of activation of nociceptor afferent nerves by actual or potential, tissue-damaging stimuli.
Affected people are missing some nociceptor fibers that carry pain signals to the brain, the researchers found.