nociceptor


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nociceptor

 [no″se-sep´tor]
a receptor for pain, stimulated by various kinds of tissue injury. adj., adj nocicep´tive.

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr, -tōr),
A peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor

/no·ci·cep·tor/ (-sep´ter) a receptor for pain caused by injury, physical or chemical, to body tissues.nocicep´tive

nociceptor

(nō′sĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to pain.

nociceptor

[nō′sēsep′tər]
a somatic and visceral free nerve ending of thinly myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. It usually reacts to tissue injury but also may be excited by endogenous chemical substances.
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Nociceptors

nociceptor

Pain receptor Neurology Any of a class of periarticular and mucocutaneous sense organs and neural receptors–eg, reflex loops for reception and response to pain; located primarily in the skin or viscera, nociceptors respond to chemical, mechanical, or other stimuli

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr)
A peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor

a receptor in the form of a naked dendrite which reacts in response to a pain stimulus.

Nociceptor

A nerve cell that is capable of sensing pain and transmitting a pain signal.

nociceptor

peripheral nerve ending, specific for appreciation and transmission of painful or noxious stimuli

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr)
Peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor (nō´sisep´tər),

n somatic and visceral free nerve endings of thinly myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. They usually react to tissue injury but also may be excited by endogenous chemical substances.

nociceptor

a receptor that is stimulated by injury; a receptor for pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nociceptor subpopulations involved in hyperalgesic priming.
Action potentials generated in nociceptors and injured nerve fibers release excitatory neurotransmitters at their synaptic terminals such as L-glutamate and substance P and trigger cellular events in the central nervous system that extend over different time frames.
Capsaicin weakly activates conventional C-fiber nociceptors, but produces a vigorous response in a subtype of C-fiber nociceptors that are insensitive to mechanical stimuli.
The specific pathologic features are not well understood; inflammation of the plantar fascia, thickening of the proximal fascia, decreased vascularity, peritendinous inflammation, loss of normal elasticity, and alteration of nociceptor physiology all may play roles in the onset and persistence of heel pain.
Adaptive pain is a normal response to nociceptor activation by a noxious stimulus that is intended to prevent tissue injury and/or promote healing of injured tissue.
Sensitisation: Increased intensity of nociceptor responses.
18) Almost a century ago, Sherrington proposed the existence of the nociceptor, a primary sensory neuron which is activated by stimuli capable of causing tissue damage.
These results suggest that EEMO and AXyl mainly exert their effect by altering the process of sensitization of the nociceptor (a common phenomenon during the inflammatory response) than by blocking the activation of the nociceptor itself.
Sodium channels are electrogenic; that is, they produce tiny electrical signals and help by contributing to nociceptor firing.
Analgesia by direct antagonism of nociceptor sensitization involves the arginine-NO-cGMP pathway.