nociception


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Related to nociception: allodynia, Nociceptors, Neuropathic pain

nociception

 [no″se-sep´shun]
the ability to feel pain, caused by stimulation of a nociceptor. Physiologically, it is composed of four processes: transduction, transmission, modulation, and perception. Called also pain sense, algesia, and algesthesia.
The four processes that make up nociception: transduction, transmission, modulation, and perception. From Ferrante and VadeBoncouer, 1993.

nociception

/no·ci·cep·tion/ (no″sĭ-sep´shun) pain sense.

nociception

(nō′sĭ-sĕp′shən)
n.
The perception of pain, resulting from neural processing of pain stimuli.

nociception (nōˑ·si·sep·shn),

n awareness of tissue injury.

nociception

perception of a painful stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Parthenolide inhibits nociception and neurogenic vasodilatation in the trigeminovascular system by targeting the TRPA1 channel.
Because the BIS response is sensitive to nociception and is mediated by the use of analgesic and sedative agents (Brocas et al, 2002; Guignard, Menigaux, Dupont, Fletcher, & Chauvin, 2000), lower BIS fluctuations in this study may be attributable to the use of higher doses of these medications in patients with TBI compared with other ICU populations.
Raja SN, Meyer RA, Ringkamp M and Campbell JN (2010) Peripheral neural mechanisms of nociception.
Oxytocin in the periaqueductal grey regulates nociception in the rat.
The function of pain is to aid future avoidance of the pain source, whereas nociception enables a reflex response that provides immediate protection but no awareness or changes to long-term behaviour," Professor Elwood said.
They found a linear analgesic dose response for both doses of cannabis, compared with placebo, and reported that the effect was not due to lysis of anxiety but to reduction of core nociception as well as emotional responses to pain (J.
Another potential target for OAB treatment is the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily, which has been demonstrated to be involved in nociception and mechanosensory transduction in various organ systems.
Many patients and health care professionals do not distinguish the pain experience from nociception, which describes the neural processes involved in the transduction of noxious stimuli.
Neurological researchers present results of investigation into various aspects of receptor and processing centers that produce the sensory modalities such as touch, temperature, proprioception, and nociception.
Possible stimulatory effects on neovascularization and inhibition of nociception with liberation of pain inhibiting substances (endorphins) are expected to occur (Mouzopoulos et al.
In some pathological conditions, pain may occur without nociception, or nociception without pain.
Studies in experimental animals have well documented the synthesis of NO in the brain, and its role in a variety of neuronal functions including learning and memory processes, cortical arousal, nociception, food intake, penile erection, yawning, blood vessel dilatation and immune response (1).