noble gases


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no·ble gas·es

elements in the zero group in the periodic series: helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon.

no·ble gas·es

(nō'bĕl gas'ĕz)
Elements in the zero group in the periodic series: helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon.
Synonym(s): inert gases.

noble gases,

n.pl a group of very stable elements, such as neon and argon, that do not easily react with other atoms because of their filled outer electron shell. Also called
inert gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research takes aim at a question that has vexed geoscientists for years: how to reconcile leading theories about the convection of Earth's mantle with observations of ancient noble gases in volcanic rocks.
Technavio's analysts forecast the global noble gases market to grow at a CAGR of 4.
The noble gases segment is projected to be the largest market for the globalHigh Purity Gases Market .
This includes members of a family of seven elements called the noble gases, some of which -- such as helium and neon -- are household names.
The only important variable is the atomic mass, which determines how the ratios of noble gases change as they tag along with migrating natural gas.
Helium walks into a bar and orders a beer, the bartender says: "Sorry, we don't serve noble gases here.
The longer a fluid sits in the Earth over time, the more it interacts with the rock and creates radiogenic isotopes of the noble gases.
They found that the water is rich in dissolved gases like hydrogen, methane and different forms - called isotopes - of noble gases such as helium, neon, argon and xenon.
Analysis showed the water is rich in dissolved gasses, such as hydrogen and methane, as well as noble gases such as helium, neon, argon and xenon.
An Ultramat module for measuring infrared-active gases and a Calomat module for hydrogen and noble gases are also planned.
The contents include sections on each of the elemental groups, including the main groups (or families), alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, and noble gases.
In the early 1960s it was discovered that, contrary to their reputation, the heavier noble gases can form compounds under certain conditions.