nightmare


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nightmare

 [nīt´mār]
a terrifying dream; an anxiety attack during dreaming, accompanied by mild autonomic reactions and usually awakening the dreamer, who recalls the dream but is oriented.
nightmare disorder a sleep disorder of the parasomnia group, consisting of repeated episodes of nightmares.

night·mare

(nīt'mār),
A terrifying dream, as in which one is unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
See also: incubus, succubus.
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]

nightmare

/night·mare/ (nīt´mār″) a terrifying dream, usually awakening the dreamer.

nightmare

(nīt′mâr′)
n.
1. A dream arousing feelings of intense fear, horror, and distress.
2. An event or experience that is intensely distressing.

night′mar′ish adj.
night′mar′ish·ly adv.
night′mar′ish·ness n.

nightmare

[nīt′mer]
Etymology: AS, niht, night, mara, incubus
a dream occurring during rapid eye movement sleep that arouses feelings of intense inescapable fear, terror, distress, or extreme anxiety and that usually awakens the sleeper. Compare pavor nocturnus, sleep terror disorder.

nightmare

Anxiety dream, dream anxiety attack Psychiatry An anxiety-provoking dream occurring during REM sleep, accompanied by autonomic nervous system hyperactivity Onset Begins in childhood usually before age 10, more common in girls, often seen in normal childhood unless they interfere with sleep, development or psychosocial development; nightmares in adulthood are often associated with outside stressors or coincide with another mental disorder; nightmares usually occur during REM sleep and include unpleasant or frightening dreams; they are most common in the early morning, and may follow frightening movies/TV shows or emotional situations, but may be associated with psychological disturbances or severe stress, especially in adults Treatment None. Cf Sleep terror disorder.

night·mare

(nīt'mār)
A terrifying dream, as if one were unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
Synonym(s): incubus (2) .
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]

nightmare

A frightening dream occurring during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep often connected with a traumatic prior event such as an assault or a car accident. Nightmares may be caused by withdrawal of sleeping tablets. The Anglo-Saxon word maere means an evil male spirit or incubus intent on sexual intercourse with a sleeping woman, but nightmares seldom have a sexual content.
References in periodicals archive ?
At 75 to 100 mg/d in a clinical trial, topiramate partially or completely suppressed nightmares.
WHAT YOU JUST ATE That sugary scoop of Ben & Jerry's AmeriCone Dream can fuel nightmares.
Further analysis that adjusted for potential confounders found that the strongest independent risk factors for nightmares were insomnia, exhaustion, and the depressive symptom of "negative attitude toward self.
If you're too afraid to brave The Nightmare Realm on your own, why not organise a group trip for your work colleagues, youth group, social group, or fellow students?
Razaq's new play, also titled The Nightmares of Carlos Fuentes , will bedirected byNicolas Kent and staged at the Arcola Theatre this July and August .
Ramsay has filmed Kitchen Nightmares in Spain before when he visited a restaurant in Nerja in 2007.
In the case above, my nightmare client was using my company as a bank.
A Nightmare on Lime Street also stars Michael Starke, Mark Moraghan, Lindzi Germain and Lynn Francis, with actor Anthony Watson standing in for Gest to the end of the run.
The Wacky Wordshop has published the book, entitled Living a Nightmare.
Craven officially laid his hideously-disfigured creation to rest in 1994 with the self-referential New Nightmare and now, more than 15 years later, Freddy is resurrected in a slick yet soulless remake that doesn't have a clue how to scare an audience.
Imagery rehearsal therapy is a broad term for myriad cognitive-imagery treatments for chronic and potentially acute nightmare disorders.
And some tactics don't work: Last year's "Nightmare" featured a different house in each of the five New York boroughs, which was a logistical nightmare.