nick


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nick

(nik),
In molecular biology, hydrolytic cleavage of a phosphodiester bond in one strand of a double-stranded polynucleic acid. Compare: cut.

nick

Etymology: ME, nyke, notch
a split in a single strand of DNA that can be made with the enzyme deoxyribonuclease or with ethidium bromide. See also cut.

nick

Molecular biology
noun A single-strand break in a double-stranded nucleic acid, usually DNA, at which point either one or more nucleotides are absent or there is a break in the phosphodiester bond between two adjacent nucleotides on one strand of the nucleic acid (DNA) duplex. Nicked sites are characterised by increased mobility.

verb To effect a nick in a double-stranded nucleic acid (usually DNA).

nick

a single-stranded cut or break in a DNA molecule. Nicking of DNA may form part of a DNA repair mechanism, as occurs after damage caused by, for example, ultraviolet light.

nick

1. said of a mating that is likely to produce superior offspring.
2. slang for body condition; an animal in good body condition is said to be in good nick.
3. a break in a strand of nucleic acid.
References in classic literature ?
I don't want to marry Nick, or any other man,' Lena murmured.
He jammed one end of the board into two nicks in the bulwarks, kicked out the leg, and ducked just in time to avoid a swinging blow from the man-o'-war's man.
he laughed, giving with his forefinger a little pleasant nick to his hostess's chin.
And it was certainly jolly lucky that Travers turned up so well in the nick of time.
You must know, with your wide experience of turf matters, Colonel Ross, that it is possible to make a slight nick upon the tendons of a horse's ham, and to do it subcutaneously, so as to leave absolutely no trace.
Dorothy was shocked to see that the cow had broken her leg off, and that the pail was lying in several small pieces, while the poor milkmaid had a nick in her left elbow.
Our medical guide, philosopher, and friend is like the hero in a melodrama--he always comes upon the scene just, and only just, in the nick of time.
At his side fights a huge Martian war-hound, nor did I need a second look to know that it was Woola--my faithful Woola who had thus well performed his arduous task and brought the succoring legions in the nick of time.
Already the stables were lit up like a chandelier; there was a staccato rattle of horseshoes in the stable yard, and the great gates were opening as we skimmed past in the nick of time.
Why, I always called you Nick in my heart, and though lost to sight, to memory dear.
But Ozma soon conquered her, with the help of Glinda the Good, and after that I went to live with Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodman.
He's the brightest man in all the world, is dear Nick Chopper; and the kindest-hearted.