neutrophil


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to neutrophil: hypersegmented neutrophil

neutrophil

 [noo´tro-fil]
1. any cell, structure, or histologic element readily stainable with neutral dyes.
Neutrophil maturation. From Ignatavicius and Workman, 2002.
2. a granular leukocyte having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing very fine granules; called also polymorphonuclear leukocyte and neutrophilic leukocyte. See also heterophil.
band neutrophil band cell.
stab neutrophil band cell.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl),
1. A mature white blood cell in the granulocytic series, formed by myelopoietic tissue of the bone marrow (sometimes also in extramedullary sites), and released into the circulating blood, where they normally represent 54-65% of the total number of leukocytes. When stained with the usual Romanowsky-type dyes neutrophils are characterized by a nucleus dark purple-blue nucleus, lobated (three to five distinct lobes joined by thin strands of chromatin), with a rather coarse network of fairly dense chromatin; and a cytoplasm that is faintly pink (sharply contrasted with the nucleus) that contains numerous fine pink or violet-pink granules, that is, not acidophilic or basophilic (as in eosinophils or basophils). The precursors of neutrophils, in order of increasing maturity, are: myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band forms. Although the terms neutrophilic leukocytes and neutrophilic granulocytes include younger cells in which neutrophilic granules are recognized, the two expressions are frequently used as synonyms for neutrophils, which are mature forms unless otherwise indicated by a modifying term, such as immature neutrophil.
See also: leukocyte, leukocytosis.
2. Any cell or tissue that manifests no special affinity for acid or basic dyes, that is, the cytoplasm stains approximately equally with either type of dye.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]

neutrophil

/neu·tro·phil/ (noo´tro-fil)
1. a granular leukocyte having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing very fine granules; cf. heterophil.
2. any cell, structure, or histologic element readily stainable with neutral dyes.

rod neutrophil , stab neutrophil one whose nucleus is not divided into segments.

neutrophil

(no͞o′trə-fĭl′, nyo͞o′-)
adj.
Not stained strongly or definitely by either acid or basic dyes but stained readily by neutral dyes. Used especially of white blood cells.
n.
A neutrophil cell, especially an abundant type of granular white blood cell that is highly destructive of microorganisms.

neu′tro·phile′ (-fīl′), neu′tro·phil′ic (-fĭl′ĭk) adj.

neutrophil

[no̅o̅′trəfil]
Etymology: L, neuter + Gk, philein, to love
polymorphonuclear, granular leukocyte whose cytoplasmic granules stain with neutral dyes. The nucleus stains dark blue and contains three to five segments connected by slender threads of nuclear membrane. The cytoplasm contains fine, inconspicuous neutral granules. Neutrophils are the circulating white blood cells essential for phagocytosis and proteolysis by which bacteria, cellular debris, and solid particles are removed and destroyed. A neutrophil count less than or equal to 500/uL may be life-threatening. See also basophil, eosinophil, granulocyte.

neutrophil

 A phagocytic WBC, normally constituting 60-70% of circulating WBCs. See Band, Dysplastic neutrophil, Hypersegmented neutrophil, Polymorphonuclear neutrophil.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl)
1. A mature white blood cell in the granulocytic series, formed by bone marrow and released into the circulating blood, where neutrophils normally represent from 54 to 65% of the total number of leukocytes in a differential. When stained, neutrophils are characterized by: 1) a nucleus that is dark purple-blue and lobated; 2) a cytoplasm that is faintly pink and contains numerous fine pink or violet-pink granules. The precursors of neutrophils in order of increasing maturity, are: myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band forms.
See also: leukocyte, leukocytosis
2. Any cell or tissue that manifests no special affinity for acid or basic dyes, i.e., the cytoplasm stains approximately equally with either type of dye.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]

neutrophil

, neutrophile (noo'tro-fil?, nu') (-fil?) [ neutro- + -phile],

NE

Enlarge picture
NEUTROPHILS: two segmented neutrophils
A granular white blood cell (WBC), the most common type (55% to 70%) of WBC. Neutrophils are responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. They play a primary role in inflammation, are readily attracted to foreign antigens (chemotaxis), and destroy them by phagocytosis. Neutrophils killed during inflammation release destructive enzymes and toxic oxygen radicals that eradicate infectious microorganisms. An inadequate number of neutrophils (neutropenia) leaves the body at high risk for infection from many sources and requires protective precautions on the part of health care workers. Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, which destroys leukocytes, must be carefully protected from infections during the course of therapy and until the bone marrow produces additional leukocytes.

As part of a severe inflammatory response or autoimmune disorder, neutrophils may begin attacking normal cells and cause tissue damage. This occurs in adult respiratory distress syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used drugs to minimize the damage caused by severe inflammation. Synonym: neutrophilic leukocyte See: illustration; blood for illus.

polysegmented neutrophil

Polymorphonuclear leukocyte.illustration

neutrophil

A white blood cell of the granulocyte group, with a multilobed (polymorph) nucleus and numerous granules in the CYTOPLASM that stain neither red with eosin nor blue with basic dyes. Neutrophils are the major circulating PHAGOCYTES of the granulocyte group. Compare EOSINOPHIL and BASOPHIL.

neutrophil

the most common type of white blood cell (LEUCOCYTES) formed in the bone marrow and with a normal count in human blood of between 2500 and 7500 cells per mm3. They have lobed nuclei and granular cytoplasm. Neutrophils are PHAGOCYTES, and are important in combating bacterial infections.

Neutrophil

The primary type of white blood cell involved in inflammation. Neutrophils are a type of granulocyte, also known as a polymorphonuclear leukocyte.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl)
A mature white blood cell in granulocytic series, formed by myelopoietic tissue of bone marrow and released into circulating blood.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]

neutrophil,

n a polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN). See also leukocyte, polymorphonuclear (PMN).

neutrophil

1. one of the three granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing lysosomes that stain characteristically and enable neutrophils to be distinguished from basophils and eosinophils; called also a granulocyte or polymorphonuclear leukocyte. See also heterophil (1).
2. any cell, structure or histological element readily stainable with neutral dyes.

band neutrophil
see stab neutrophil (below).
neutrophil chemotactic factor
hypersegmented neutrophil
increased number of nuclear lobes; seen in hyperadrenocorticism or during treatment with corticosteroids, and in blood that has been in transit for long periods.
hyposegmented neutrophil
a lack of nuclear lobes; may occur in chronic infections and is a feature of pelger-huet anomaly.
neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio
correlates directly with the magnitude of the total leukocyte count in response to disease in domestic animals; it varies from 0.5 in cattle to 3.5 in dogs.
stab neutrophil
a neutrophilic leukocyte whose nucleus is not divided into segments.
toxic neutrophil
one with blue-black or large reddish cytoplasmic granules and diffuse cytoplasmic basophilia and vacuolation; caused by disruption of maturation.
References in periodicals archive ?
This earlier work indicated that not all neutrophils are the same," said Dr.
Neutrophils are the most abundant white blood cell in the body and generally are the first cells to migrate toward inflammation.
Respiratory burst activity of neutrophil was adjudged on the basis of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production ability in collected blood samples.
Any blood clots were gently washed off the slides with normal saline, care being taken to avoid scraping of the cell layer that could disturb the adherent neutrophil monolayer.
MPO, which is abundant in azurophilic granules of neutrophils and in the lysosomes of monocytes, plays a key role in amplifying the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide generated by the respiratory burst (1), (2).
It helps illuminate, for instance, why, after chemotherapy, some cancer patients contract life-threatening infections even when in isolation under sterile conditions: if the neutrophils of these patients are "weak," even the smallest numbers of bacteria--for example, those present in the gut--can tilt the fragile immune balance in favor of the bacteria.
Neutrophil volume distribution width: a new automated hematologic parameter for acute infection.
acquired and primary immunodeficiency disorders associated with abnormalities of neutrophil production or function
A few years ago, Caughey's laboratory studied mice infected with the bacterium Mycoplasma pulmonis and found that their neutrophils released histamine.
For example, neutrophil granulocytes (a group of specialized white blood cells) react to bacteria by releasing substances called serine proteases.
Results: Subcutaneous mistletoe therapy has a statistical significant numeric stimulant effect on leukocytes, absolute neutrophils and absolute lymphocytes, which is apparent after 30 days of treatment with injections three times per week.
When these films were examined, a variety of nucleated cells were found, including what we now know as neutrophils (i.