neutron


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neutron

 [noo´tron]
an electrically neutral or uncharged particle of matter existing along with protons in the atoms of all elements except the mass 1 isotope of hydrogen.

neu·tron (n),

(nū'tron),
An electrically neutral particle in the nuclei of all atoms (except hydrogen-1) with a mass slightly greater than that of a proton; in isolation, has a half-life of about 10.3 minutes.
[L. neuter, neither]

neutron

/neu·tron/ (noo´tron) an electrically neutral or uncharged particle of matter existing along with protons in the nucleus of atoms of all elements except the mass 1 isotope of hydrogen. Symbol n.

neutron

[n(y)o̅o̅′tron]
Etymology: L, neuter, neither; Gk, elektron, amber
(in physics) an elementary particle that is a constituent of the nuclei of all elements except the isotopic form of hydrogen 1H. It has no electric charge and has approximately the same mass as a proton. Compare electron, proton. See also atom.

neutron

As defined in magnetic resonance, a neutron is an uncharged neutral particle located in the nucleus of an atom which serves as a stabiliser.

neu·tron

(nū'tron)
An electrically neutral particle in the nuclei of all atoms (except hydrogen-1) with a mass slightly larger than that of a proton; in isolation, it breaks down to a proton and an electron with a half-life of about 10.3 minutes.
[L. neuter, neither]

neutron (nōōˑ·trn),

n the neutral subatomic particle located within the nucleus of an atom. Its mass is equivalent to that of a proton.

neu·tron

(nū'tron)
An electrically neutral particle in the nuclei of all atoms (except hydrogen-1) with a mass slightly larger than that of a proton; in isolation, it breaks down to a proton and an electron with a half-life of about 10.3 minutes.
[L. neuter, neither]

neutron

an electrically neutral or uncharged particle of matter existing along with protons in the atoms of all elements except the mass 1 isotope of hydrogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tyler SW (1988) Neutron Moisture Meter Calibration in large diameter boreholes.
The interaction between neutron and nucleus varies widely and unsystematically from one atom in the periodic table to the next, and from one isotope of a given atom to the next.
Physicist Clifford Shull pioneered the use of neutron scattering to decipher the structure of materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 1950s.
Constraints on non-Newtonian gravity in the nanometer range from the experiment on neutron quantum states in the Earth's gravitational field
Neutron decay, like all radioactive decay, is a matter of probabilities.
What options do we have to control the reliability of calculations of radiative corrections to neutron [beta]-decay if we can neither obtain them from any set of neutron decay experiments nor calculate them in a model independent way using the standard approach?
It promises to detect neutrons over a range of intensities at least 100 times greater than the old method.
We present a progress report on an experimental program to improve the measurement of the neutron lifetime, [[tau].
Close X-ray scrutiny of the neutron star inside RCW 103 belies that simple picture.
ud], which is determined most sensitively by the neutron life-time [[tau].