neurotoxin


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neurotoxin

 [noor´o-tok″sin]
a substance that is poisonous or destructive to nerve tissue.

neu·ro·tox·in

(nū'rō-tok'sin),
1. Synonym(s): neurolysin
2. Any toxin that acts specifically on nervous tissue.

neurotoxin

/neu·ro·tox·in/ (noor´o-tok″sin) a substance that is poisonous or destructive to nerve tissue.

neurotoxin

(no͝or′ō-tŏk′sĭn, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A toxin that damages or destroys nerve tissue.

neu′ro·tox′ic (-tŏk′sĭk) adj.
neu′ro·tox·ic′i·ty (-tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

neurotoxin

[noo͡r′ōtok′sin]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + toxikon, poison
a toxin that acts directly on the tissues of the central nervous system, traveling along the axis cylinders of the motor nerves to the brain. The toxin may be secreted in the venom of certain snakes, or it may be present on the spines of a shell or in the flesh of fish or shellfish; it may be produced by certain bacteria or by the cellular disintegration of certain bacteria.

neurotoxin

Toxicology A substance that is toxic or destroys nerve tissue–eg, exotoxins, present in plants and animals and either block conduction of the nerve impulse or synaptic transmission, by binding to the voltage-gated Na+ channel protein or ↑ neuronal activity. See Conotoxin, Conus, Puffer fish, Red tide, Shiga neurotoxin.

neu·ro·tox·in

(nūr'ō-tok'sin)
1. Synonym(s): neurolysin.
2. Any toxin that acts specifically on nervous tissue.

Neurotoxin

A substance that damages, destroys, or impairs the functioning of nerve tissue.
Mentioned in: Fugu Poisoning

neurotoxin (nerˈ·ō·täkˑ·sin),

n a poisonous substance that damages tissues within the central nervous system; produced by certain bacteria or by the cellular deterioration of some bacteria. Other naturally occurring neurotoxins are present in the venom of some snakes, the spines of particular shells, or the skin of a shellfish or fish. Many drugs and chemicals are also neurotoxic.

neurotoxin

a substance that is poisonous or destructive to nerve tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The body is constantly trying to eliminate neurotoxins via the available exit routes: liver, kidney, skin, and exhaled air.
botulinum that can occasionally produce botulinum neurotoxin (HPA, 2013).
Some of these methods are sensitive enough and used in some laboratories for screening samples, however, any of these methods is so far not authorized for official or clinical use due to their inability to differentiate active and inactive neurotoxin (109).
As to the neurotoxin (R)-Sal, it had no distinct effect on the concentrations of DA, but produced a significant increase in the ACh concentrations.
Neurotoxins frequently cause inflammation, damage hormone pathways, and affect the immune system.
Extensive human populations are exposed to a potent neurotoxin aerosol that affects human health in doses that are at or near our analytic limits of detection (picogram to nanogram range).
Halagappa and Mattson took the work a step further by designing an experiment in which mice that had been on the four different diets were exposed to a neurotoxin called kainic acid, which is known to damage nerve cells in the hippocampus, a brain region involved in learning and memory.
Mercury is a neurotoxin that has been linked to birth defects, learning disabilities, cancers and heart disease.
The evidence emerged from a study of monkeys injected with a neurotoxin which produces a Parkinson's-like illness.
By 1978, scientists had discovered that lead is a neurotoxin.
Lindane is a neurotoxin that persists in air and water and has been found at high levels in the Arctic.