neurosyphilis


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neurosyphilis

 [noor″o-sif´ĭ-lis]
the central nervous system manifestations of tertiary syphilis, which may be divided into two groups, asymptomatic and symptomatic; see also general paresis and tabes dorsalis.

neu·ro·syph·i·lis

(nū'rō-sif'i-lis),
Infection of the central nervous system by Treponema pallidum (syphilis); there are several subdivisions, including asymptomatic neurosyphilis, meningeal neurosyphilis, meningovascular neurosyphilis, paretic neurosyphilis, and tabetic neurosyphilis.

neurosyphilis

/neu·ro·syph·i·lis/ (-sif´il-is) syphilis of the central nervous system.

neurosyphilis

[-sif′ilis]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + sys, hog, philein, to love
infection of the central nervous system by Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, which may invade the meninges and cerebrovascular system. If the brain tissue is affected, general paresis may result. If the spinal cord is infected, tabes dorsalis may result. See also syphilis. neurosyphilitic, adj.

neurosyphilis

Any of the rare neurological manifestations of tertiary syphilis.

Clinical findings
Lightning-like pain, ataxia, optic nerve degeneration leading to blindness, urinary incontinence, loss of position sense, neuropathic arthropathy (Charcot joints), personality changes, aphasia, paralysis, seizures. Patients with early syphilis who are co-infected with HIV may not respond to high-dose penicillin G, leading to an increase in Tertiary syphilis.

Clinical forms of neurosyphilis
• Asymptomatic with only a positive VDRL in the CSF.
• General paresis or chronic meningoencephalitis.
• Gummatous.
• Meningovascular or thromboembolic with cerebral infarction or cranial nerve defects.
• Tabes with degeneration of the posterior columns of the spinal cord and nerve roots, decreased peripheral reflexes and proprioceptive sensation, evoking Charcot’s joints.

neurosyphilis

Neurology Any of the rare neural changes of 3º syphilis Clinical Lightning-like pain, ataxia, optic nerve degeneration → blindness, urinary incontinence, loss of position sense, Charcot's joints, personality changes, aphasia, paralysis, seizures. See STS-RPR, VDRL. See Charcot's joints, Windswept cortex, Tabes dorsalis. Cf Quaternary syphilis.

neu·ro·syph·i·lis

(nūr'ō-sif'i-lis)
Infection of the central nervous system by Treponema pallidum.

neurosyphilis

Any syphilitic infection of the nervous system. This is usually a late (tertiary) manifestation of untreated SYPHILIS, but may occur in adolescence. Its effects are widespread and include TABES DORSALIS, general paralysis of the insane (general paresis or GPI), dementia and involvement of the blood vessels of the brain and the brain coverings (meningovascular syphilis).
References in periodicals archive ?
Neurosyphilis symptoms may include meningitis (marked by headache, fever, stiff neck), visual changes (blurred or lost vision, photophobia, other signs of ocular inflammation), hearing changes or loss, or facial weakness.
For neurosyphilis, CDC STD treatment guidelines recommend a 10-14 day course of aqueous crystalline penicillin G 18-24 million units per day, administered as 3-4 million units IV every 4 hours or continuous infusion.
005; treatment cost, $13,931); and neurosyphilis, including the need for long-term nursing home care (probability, 0.
My biggest concern would be neurosyphilis, for which it is the drug of choice," she said.
Syphilis has an historical association with mental illness, and neurosyphilis remains relevant in the psychiatric population, inter alia, as a cause or aggravating factor of various psychiatric disorders (dementia, mood disorders, personality changes and psychosis).
If you rule out reinfection in these patients, they should probably undergo a lumbar puncture to make sure they don't have underlying asymptomatic neurosyphilis.
The cerebrospinal fluid Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test was nonreactive, thus ruling out the presence of neurosyphilis.
Indirect methods of diagnosis include serologic testing of blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and detection of CSF abnormalities (elevated white blood cell count or protein) consistent with neurosyphilis.
Six patients had neurosyphilis or ophthalmic syphilis, all of whom also had secondary rashes.
19) Neurosyphilis is increasing in frequency but rarely causes a picture easily confused with MS, particularly in the MRI era.
ADEM Differential Diagnoses Multiple sclerosis Guillain-Barre syndrome Stroke Meningitis Lymphoma Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy Toxic/metabolic encephalopathy Infectious encephalitis Vasculitis Postmalarial neurological syndrome HIV-1 central nervous system complications Metastatic tumor Glioblastoma multiforme Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Neurosarcoidosis Cavernous sinus syndromes Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis Neurosyphilis Systemic lupus erythematous Wegener granulomatosis Note.
The prozone phenomenon has been reported primarily in early syphilis (especially secondary syphilis), (3,4) but has also been reported in the setting of isolated neurosyphilis.