neurosis

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neurosis

 [noo͡-ro´sis] (pl. neuro´ses)
former name for a category of mental disorders characterized by anxiety and avoidance behavior. In general, the term has been used to refer to disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the person, reality testing does not yield unusual results, behavior does not violate gross social norms, and there is no apparent organic etiology. Such disorders are currently classified as anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, mood disorders, sexual disorders, and somatoform disorders.
anxiety neurosis an obsolete term (Freud) for conditions now reclassified as panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.
hysterical neurosis a former classification of mental disorders, now divided into conversion disorder and dissociative disorders.
obsessive-compulsive neurosis former name for obsessive-compulsive disorder.
prison neurosis chronophobia occurring in prisoners having trouble adjusting to a long prison sentence, characterized by feelings of restlessness, panic, anxiety, and claustrophobia.
transference neurosis a phenomenon occurring in most psychoanalyses, in which the patient undergoes, with the analyst as the object, an intense repetition of childhood conflicts, reexperiencing impulses, feelings, and fantasies that originally developed in relation to the parent.

neu·ro·sis

, pl.

neu·ro·ses

(nū-rō'sis, -sēz),
1. A psychological or behavioral disorder in which anxiety is the primary characteristic; defense mechanisms or any phobias are the adjustive techniques that a person learns to cope with this underlying anxiety. In contrast to the psychoses, people with a neurosis do not exhibit gross distortion of reality or gross disorganization of personality but in severe cases, those affected may be as disabled as those with a psychosis.
2. A functional nervous disease, or one in which there is no evident lesion.
3. A peculiar state of tension or irritability of the nervous system; any form of nervousness.
Synonym(s): neurotic disorder
[neuro- + G. -osis, condition]

neurosis

/neu·ro·sis/ (ndbobr-ro´sis) pl. neuro´ses  
1. former name for a category of mental disorders characterized by anxiety and avoidance behavior, with symptoms distressing to the patient, intact reality testing, no violations of gross social norms, and no apparent organic etiology.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, the process that gives rise to these disorders as well as personality disorders and some psychotic disorders, being triggering of unconscious defense mechanisms by unresolved conflicts.

character neurosis  a type of high-level personality disorder with some neurotic characteristics.
hysterical neurosis  former name for a group of conditions now divided between conversion disorder and dissociative disorders.

neurosis

(no͝o-rō′sĭs, nyo͝o-)
n. pl. neuro·ses (-sēz)
A mild mental disorder characterized by excessive anxiety, insecurity, or obsession, usually compensated for by various defense mechanisms.

neurosis

[no̅o̅rō′sis] pl. neuroses,
former name for a category of mental disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the person, reality testing is intact, behavior does not violate gross social norms, and there is no apparent organic cause. Classified in DSM-IV under anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, mood disorders, sexual disorders, and somatoform disorders.

neurosis

Psychology An older term for a disorder characterized by excess anxiety and avoidance behaviors Neuroses Anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, mood disorder, personality disorder, bipolar I disorder, depression, histrionic personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, phobias. See Neurotic disorder, Semi-starvation neurosis, Sunday neurosis.

neu·ro·sis

, pl. neuroses (nūr-ō'sis, -sēz)
1. A psychological or behavioral disorder in which anxiety is the primary characteristic; defense mechanisms or any of the phobias are the adjustive techniques that a person learns to cope with this underlying anxiety. In contrast to the psychoses, people with a neurosis do not exhibit gross distortion of reality or disorganization of personality.
2. A functional nervous disease, or one for which there is no evident lesion.
3. A peculiar state of tension or irritability of the nervous system; any form of nervousness.
Synonym(s): neurotic disorder, psychoneurosis.
[neuro- + G. -osis, condition]

neurosis

Any long-term mental or behavioural disorder, in which contact with reality is retained and the condition is recognized by the sufferer as abnormal. Attempts have been made to prohibit the term as pejorative and insulting but these have failed mainly because of a more complete and humane understanding of the subject and of the plight of neurotic sufferers. A neurosis essentially features anxiety or behaviour exaggeratedly designed to avoid anxiety. Defence mechanisms against anxiety take various forms and may appear as PHOBIAS, OBSESSIONS, COMPULSIONS or as sexual dysfunctions. In recent attempts at classification, the disorders formerly included under the neuroses have, possibly for reasons of political correctness, been given new names. The general term, neurosis, is now called anxiety disorder; hysteria has become a somatoform or conversion disorder; amnesia, fugue, multiple personality and depersonalization have become dissociative disorders; and neurotic depression has become a dysthymic disorder. These changes are helpful and explanatory but ignore the futility of euphemism. Psychoanalysis has proved of little value in curing these conditions and Freud's speculations as to their origins are not now widely accepted outside Freudian schools of thought. Neurotic disorders are probably best regarded as being the result of inappropriate early programming. Cognitive behaviour therapy seems effective in some cases.

neu·ro·sis

, pl. neuroses (nūr-ō'sis, -sēz)
1. Psychological or behavioral disorder with anxiety as primary characteristic; affected patients may be as disabled as those with a psychosis.
2. A functional nervous disease, or one in which there is no evident lesion.
3. A peculiar state of tension or irritability of the nervous system.

neurosis,

n a diffusely defined term referring to a mental disorder for which professional help may be needed but that is milder than a psychosis; generally, a functional disorder in which there is no gross personality disorganization but there is an inability to cope effectively with some routine frustrations, anxieties, and daily problems. Somatic conditions may be factors in the cause and may be symptoms in a neurosis; however, the use of the term to describe a dysfunction of the nervous system is obsolete. Also called
psychoneurosis.

neurosis

pl. neuroses; an emotional disorder that can interfere with an animal's ability to lead a normal life; sometimes called psychoneurosis. Examples are weaving, crib-biting and psychogenic dermatosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is equally clear that routine circumcision arose from a mire of ignorance and now discredited theories of disease, including outright quackery (the pathologisation of male sexuality as spermatorrhoea); medical delusions (theories of reflex neuroses and masturbatory illness); puritanical zeal (the determination to suppress sexual activity in childhood and adolescence); loss of knowledge about the normal anatomy and physiology of the penis, with the result that the adhesion and non-retractability of the foreskin in young boys was classified as a congenital defect instead of being recognised as its natural condition; (68) and wild hopes that a miracle cure had been found for such rapacious diseases as tuberculosis, syphilis, polio and cancer.
A scholar of modern medicine and intellectual history, Pietikainen examines the history of neuroses in Swedish medicine and culture from 1880 to 1950, a hefty chunk of what he calls the Nervous Century, 1880-1980, during which so-called weak nerves throughout western culture led to a plethora of symptoms and diagnoses.
Vastly inferior to the racy plots and pulsating 30-something neuroses of ITV's other drama Talk To Me with Laura Fraser.
For all his neuroses, Kornheiser, who's had three exhibition games to somewhat figure out what role he'll play sandwiched between Mike Tirico's play calling and Joe Theismann's football-speak during a telecast, insists he doesn't feel the kind of pressure that Dennis Miller once had during a two-year stretch as the third ``MNF'' wheel from 2000-02.
Why, for example, did they persist in sending that twitching bundle of neuroses Natalie Appleton on Bushtucker Trials?
Her comedic timing is perfect as she narrates her journal over an 18-month period in which she loses half her body weight through eating correctly, exercise, and delving into her neuroses to discover the real reason she overeats.
But then the bride-to-be is overcome by 12 months of neuroses.
to achieve distance from the enforced neuroses of American culture, had "failed disastrously, almost totally," and lost his way.
Shorter sometimes uses false dichotomies (the issue never was so clearly "psychoanalysis versus custodialism," for instance); he often fails to distinguish between neuroses and psychoses or among psychiatrists, neurologist, psychoanalysts, and other practitioners; and he does not especially entertain voices that see the historical development of western psychiatry differently.
Revivals of Swan Lake have increasingly invested Prince Siegfried with a full range of psychological maladies--oedipal complexes, depression, neuroses.
Only if the rumor is relevant to our era, explains Collins, will it take off As in a Rorschach test, the American public brings all of its anxieties, neuroses, and projected fears to the gossip arena.
Coming on like Kenneth Williams' strung-out sister - all diction and neuroses - Julia's Fanny constantly barks orders at her put-upon hubby, Johnnie (Mark Gatiss).