neuropraxia


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Related to neuropraxia: neurotmesis

neu·ro·prax·i·a

(nū'rō-prak'sē-ă),
Commonly used misspelling of neurapraxia.

neuropraxia

[-prak′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, neuron, nerve, prassein, to do
a condition in which a nerve remains in place after a severe injury although it no longer transmits impulses.

neuropraxia

transient loss of neural conductivity due to nerve fibre compression without loss of neurofibrils; spontaneous recovery occurs in a few days to weeks (see axonotemesis; neurotmesis)
References in periodicals archive ?
The sequelae of pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, infetion, pseudoaneurysm, and neuropraxia were ranked strongly as being adverse reactions (median values 4.
The incidence of neuropraxia I reported was from a group of 520 interscalene block (ISB) patients, 286 of which were single-shot technique; the authors also noted that the catheter placement did not alter the complication rate (3).
Rupture occurs when the nerve is torn but remains attached to the spine; neuroma, when the torn nerve heals improperly with formation of scar tissue; and neuropraxia, when the nerve is stretched but not torn.
But most humbling has been the high complication rate associated with this procedure in the hands of very experienced total hip surgeons: femoral fracture, neuropraxia, a 25% incidence of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve palsies, and a 5%-10% reoperation rate," said Dr.
Neuropraxia, in which the nerve has been damaged but not torn, is the most common type of brachial plexus injury.
In our case, the vocal fold immobility was most likely secondary to a neuropraxia that arose when the abscess compressed the recurrent laryngeal nerve.
3) They are most often due to traction, fluid extravasation, and iatrogenic chondral injury, with transient neuropraxia being the most common complication.
005%), that resolved within approximately 3 months, and a single case of residual stretch neuropraxia (numbness without pain)(0.
Identification of the nerve proximal and distal to the tumor is the first important step to reducing injury and traction neuropraxia.
The secondary brachial plexus injury may be a neuropraxia (5) or an axonotmesis (8), the latter having significantly worse prognosis.