neurolytic


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Related to neurolytic: neurolysis

neu·ro·lyt·ic

(nū'rō-lit'ik),
Relating to neurolysis.

neu·ro·lyt·ic

(nūr'ō-lit'ik)
Relating to neurolysis.

neurolysis

(nū-rŏl′ĭs-ĭs)
1. The loosening of scar tissue surrounding a nerve.
2. The disintegration or destruction of nerve tissue. It is often used to treat peripheral nerve diseases, esp. those that cause intolerable pain. The painful nerve may be destroyed with drugs or chemicals, extremely cold probes, radio frequency ablation, or surgery. Painful conditions that can be treated with neurolysis include trigeminal neuralgia and glossopharyngeal neuralgia.
neurolytic (nū-rō-lĭt′ĭk), adjective

neu·ro·lyt·ic

(nūr'ō-lit'ik)
Relating to neurolysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neurolytic celiac plexus block for pain control in unresectable pancreatic cancer.
Ethanol, a hypobaric solution had been used extensively for neurolytic procedures in concentrations from 3-100% in the early 20 th century.
neurolytic block--Injection of agents to destroy nerve fibers to produce a prolonged and sometimes permanent nerve block which may benefit patients with severe intractable pain.
Key Words: superior hypogastric plexus, neurolytic block, imaging, ultrasound- guided, pelvic pain
These patients may benefit from regional blocks, axial analgesia, or neurolytic procedures.
while others deal with specific treatment modalities (hypnosis, neurolytic blocks, etc.
26) Nevertheless, t horacoscopic splanchnicectomy may offer a more effective alternative to percutaneous neurolytic techniques, because the percutaneous procedures often fail as a result of poor localization and/or inadequate volume infusion of the neurolytic (alcohol or phenol).
Calciphylaxis treated with neurolytic lumbar sympathetic block: Case report and review of the literature.
A new approach to the neurolytic block of the celiac plexus: The transaortic tecnique.
Offering detailed coverage of every available treatment option for dystonia, including four categorized sections on medical management, botulinum toxin injections, phenol or neurolytic therapy, and surgical intervention.
Fentanyl was chosen for the study for advantages like no neurolytic preservatives, highly lipophilic, so better retained within the epidural space, short half-life, so less circulating blood levels resulting from absorption and finally because it is stable in salt solutions for more than 72 hours.