neurolaw


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neurolaw

(noor′ō-law, nūr′) [″ + ″]
That branch of the system of justice that treats problems resulting from injuries or illnesses of the central or peripheral nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although concerns have been expressed about what Tallis (2011) has termed "neuromania"--the view that the complexity of human consciousness can be reduced to neural activity--neuroscience research methods are nevertheless being applied to an array of new fields, such as neuroaesthetics, neurotheology, neurolaw, neuroeconomics, and neuroeducation, to name a few.
LAW firm Hugh James has appointed Ciaran McCabe as a partner to work in its neurolaw team.
49) Stephan Schleim, Brains in Context in the Neurolaw Debate: The Examples of Free Will and "Dangerous" Brains, 35 INT'L J.
Shen, The Law and Neuroscience Bibliography: Navigating the Emerging Field of Neurolaw, 38 Int'l J.
Garcia-Lopez presents the book Forensic Psychopathology, Law, Neuroscience and Criminal Justice System, where he introduces the Neurolaw concept in an innovative way in the context of Latin American publications, being one of the first texts on the subject written in Spanish.
Molecular neuroeconomics of crime and punishment: Implications for neurolaw.
conceptualized the "law" part of neurolaw as limited to what
Shen offers a novel overview of neurolaw and mental privacy and considers how the law should treat different types of government-compelled neuroimaging evidence and other neuroscience evidence, including lie detection and mind reading.
Although neurolaw is a relatively new field, courts have relied on
By its very nature, brain injury affects people for life and needs expert, skilled handling to ensure their care is secure for the rest of their life," says Andrew Harding, partner and head of the neurolaw team at Hugh James.
Gamboa & Paul Prachyl, The Vocational Economic Consequences of Brain Injury: An Update, NEUROLAW LETTER, July 1999, at 73.