neurohormone


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neurohormone

 [noor´o-hor″mōn]
a hormone that stimulates neural mechanisms or is released when activated by neural stimuli.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nū'rō-hōr'mōn),
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (for example, norepinephrine).

neurohormone

/neu·ro·hor·mone/ (noor´o-hor″mōn) a hormone secreted by a specialized neuron into the bloodstream, the cerebrospinal fluid, or the intercellular spaces of the nervous system.

neurohormone

(no͝or′ō-hôr′mōn, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A hormone secreted by or acting on a part of the nervous system.

neu′ro·hor·mo′nal adj.

neurohormone

[noo͡r′əhôr′mōn]
a hormone produced in neurosecretory cells such as those of the hypothalamus and released into the bloodstream, the cerebrospinal fluid, or intercellular spaces of the nervous system. The product may or may not be a true systemic hormone such as epinephrine. When the hormone is not a true hormone, it may be a cell product that induces the release of a tropic hormone, which in turn stimulates an endocrine gland to release a systemic hormone. See also neuromodulator, neurotransmitter.

neu·ro·hor·mone

(nūr'ō-hōr'mōn)
A hormone formed by neurosecretory cells and liberated by nerve impulses (e.g., norepinephrine).

neurohormone

a hormone that is formed in neuron cell bodies and passes down their axons to be stored in the axon terminals until secreted into the blood stream in response to action potentials generated in these neurons (compare neurotransmitters). Examples are the hormones which are formed in nerve cells in the hypothalamus, pass down their axons to their terminals in the posterior pituitary, and are secreted there into the blood when appropriate stimuli activate the hypothalamic cells.

neurohormone

a hormone stimulating the neural mechanism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activity-dependent regulation of neurohormone synthesis and its impact on reproductive behavior in Aplysia.
To further understand the role of the endorphin messenger neurohormone in relation to exercise, look at quality and quantity of exercise, particularly as found in animal studies.
Any energy source, be it static or dynamic, will induce a change in the native resonant frequencies of one or more neurohormones or neurohormone clusters.
Since a few neurosecretory cells remained undestroyed after electrocautery in these experiments, the possibility remains that a brain neurohormone is an absolute requirement for normal egg maturation in A.
The HPA axis is a complex neurohormone mechanism, an intricate system of stimulation and feedback interactions--among the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland, and the adrenal glands--that regulates metabolic and behavioral reactions to physiological and environmental stress.
Her previous work highlighted a role for the stress-related neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor in rendering an individual vulnerable to stress-induced depression and heart disease.
62), (63) Vitamin D is now considered a neurohormone, with multiple beneficial effects in the brain.
BNP is a neurohormone produced in the ventricular myocardium in response to dilation and pressure overload, and its plasma concentration correlates with the magnitude of pressure and/or volume overload.
ABSTRACT APOW-amide is a well-known neurohormone modulator in several molluscs, and is involved in motor activities, feeding, and sexual behavior.
Prolactin is a "remarkably versatile" neurohormone for which more than 300 distinct biologic actions have been identified.
Because the hippocampus is also involved in braking the production of cortisol, a hormone produced during times of stress, study of the properties of this neurohormone after TBI is important.
But testosterone is also a neurohormone, with profound effects on our behavior and mood.