neurogram

neu·ro·gram

(nū'rō-gram),
The imprint on the brain substance theoretically remaining after every mental experience, that is, the engram or physical register of the mental experience, stimulation of which retrieves and reproduces the original experience, thereby producing memory.
[neuro- + G. gramma, something written]

neu·ro·gram

(nūr'ō-gram)
The imprint on the brain substance theoretically remaining after every mental experience, i.e., the engram or physical register of the mental experience, stimulation of which retrieves and reproduces the original experience, thereby producing memory.
[neuro- + G. gramma, something written]
References in periodicals archive ?
2]) gas via a tracheal cannula significantly enhanced the discharge of afferents in the cervical vagal trunk and in the superior laryngeal vagal branch innervating the mucosa of the larynx, using a multifibre neurogram.
Previous reports have shown that the massed neurogram activity from cranial nerves (CN) V, VII, IX, and X (trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves respectively) and from spinal nerve (SN) II (analogous to CN XII, hypoglossal nerve in mammals) in the isolated tadpole brainstem generate neural bursts that correspond to the lung and gill ventilator activities generated in the intact specimens.
In the process of completing shapes in the Torrance (1989) Test of Creative Thinking, cognitive functions work in a sort of life energy, which can lead to new structures of neurograms (Simpson, 1922).