neurochemistry

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neurochemistry

 [noor″o-kem´is-tre]
the branch of neurology dealing with the chemistry of the nervous system.

neu·ro·chem·is·try

(nū'rō-kem'is-trē),
The science concerned with the chemical aspects of nervous system structure and function.

neurochemistry

/neu·ro·chem·is·try/ (-kem´is-tre) the branch of neurology dealing with the chemistry of the nervous system.

neurochemistry

(no͝or′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The study of the chemical composition and processes of the nervous system and the effects of chemicals on it.

neu′ro·chem′i·cal (-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·chem′ist n.

neurochemistry

[-kem′istrē]
a branch of neurology that is concerned with the biochemistry of the nervous system.

neu·ro·chem·is·try

(nūr'ō-kem'is-trē)
The science concerned with the chemical aspects of nervous system structure and function.

neurochemistry

that branch of neurology dealing with the chemistry of the nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
But this drug, unlike others tried in the past, works on a specific nerve cell receptor that has been implicated in the development of ALS, says Adam Doble, a neurochemist at Rhone-Poulenc Rorer.
In addition, it also acted as further incentive for neurochemists and pharmacologists to take schizophrenia disorder seriously.
Audience: Neuroscientists, neurophysiologists, behavioral scientists, neuropharmacologists, neuroanatomists, neurochemists, neuropsychologists Languages: English Circulation: 40,648 (N America: 71%; Rest of World: 29%) Topics Editorial/authority Submission Contacts
Hospital Heidelberg) presents 21 chapters in which mostly German neurologists, psychiatrists, clinical chemists, and neurochemists review basic methods of cerebrospinal fluid (CFS) and serum analysis.
Daniel Smail's provocative inquiry into the roots of history, the relationship between historians and their evidence, and the potential for fruitful exchanges between historians and neurochemists or evolutionary biologists offers an engaging text on historical methods.
But he predicted, "We're all going to become neurochemists in a decade.
Neuroanatomists characterize the brain's connectivity patterns; neurophysiologists characterize neural activity and the "learning rules" that summarize the conditions for, and dynamics of, change; neurochemists seek the molecular mechanisms that yield these "rules"; computational neuroscientists seek to place all these within a systems perspective.
neurochemists, neurophysiologists, neuroanatomists), psychologists, physicians, mathematicians, computer scientists, linguists, and philosophers, to mention the most prominent contributors.
Neurochemists do not know yet exactly why some people have low serotonin levels.