neuroaugmentation

neu·ro·aug·men·ta·tion

(nū'rō-awg-men-tā'shŭn),
Use of electrical stimulation to supplement activity of the nervous system.

neuroaugmentation

(nūr″ō-ăwg-mĕn-tā′shŭn)
Any method used to increase the function of a nerve, esp. in managing pain. One example is transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Similar to Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), yet placed in a different part of the body, neuroaugmentation involves implanting electrodes beneath the skin to stimulate the occipital and supraorbital nerves.
A study published by the International Headache Society (2010) suggests that neuroaugmentation can markedly ease the pain, neurological symptoms and disability in 80% of patients with severe, chronic migraine and refractory chronic migraine headaches.
The 184 chapters cover basic science, patient evaluation, imaging, various generalized and regional pain syndromes, and specific treatment modalities, including nerve blocks, neuroaugmentation and implantable drug delivery systems, and advanced techniques like diskectomy, cryoneurolysis, and radiofrequency lesioning.