neuroarthropathy


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neuroarthropathy

 [noor″o-ahr-throp´ah-the]
any disease of joint structures associated with disease of the central or peripheral nervous system.

neu·ro·ar·throp·a·thy

(nū'rō-ar-throp'ă-thē),
A joint disorder caused by loss of joint sensation. See: Charcot joint.
[neuro- + G. arthron, joint, + pathos, suffering, disease]

neuroarthropathy

/neu·ro·ar·throp·a·thy/ (-ahr-throp´ah-the) any disease of joint structures associated with disease of the central or peripheral nervous system.

neuroarthropathy

[-ärthrop′əthē]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + arthron, joint, pathos, disease
a condition in which a disease of a joint is secondary to a disease of the nervous system.

neuroarthropathy

Neuropathic joint, see there; aka Charcot's joint.

neu·ro·ar·throp·a·thy

(nūr'ō-ahr-throp'ă-thē)
A joint disorder caused by loss of joint sensation.
See: Charcot joint
[neuro- + G. arthron, joint, + pathos, suffering, disease]

neuroarthropathy

any disease of joint structures associated with disease of the central or peripheral nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neuroarthropathy is a severe destructive form of degenerative arthritis resulting from loss of sensation in the involved joints, called as Charcot's joints or diabetic osteoarthropathy.
23 The Operative Treatment of Charcot Neuroarthropathy of the Foot and Ankle (Michael L.
erosion/destruction supports osteomyelitis superimposed upon neuroarthropathy.
It is very difficult to differentiate between acute neuroarthropathy and osteomyelitis, especially osteomyelitis in a patient with neuroarthropathy, as both of these are destructive processes.
Also screen patients for Charcot neuroarthropathy (FIGURE 5), a devastating complication that classically presents as a hot, red, swollen foot; the redness resolves upon elevation.
Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle: diagnosis and management strategies.
Charcot's neuroarthropathy is associated with which of the following characteristics?
Of 169 people with diabetes but no significant peripheral vascular disease, 67 had concomitant neuropathy, 34 had a history of foot ulcers, and 17 had Charcot's neuroarthropathy.
The nomenclature of the condition in the literature bears more than 40 different names: Charcot's foot, Charcot's neuro-osteoarthropathy and diabetic neuroarthropathy, to name but a few.