neurasthenia


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neurasthenia

 [noor″as-the´ne-ah]
a virtually obsolete term formerly used to describe a vague disorder marked by chronic abnormal fatigability, moderate depression, inability to concentrate, loss of appetite, insomnia, and other symptoms. Popularly called nervous prostration. adj., adj neurasthen´ic.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă),
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia

/neu·ras·the·nia/ (-as-the´ne-ah) a term virtually obsolete in Western medicine but still used in traditional Chinese medicine, denoting a mental disorder marked by chronic weakness and easy fatigability.

neurasthenia

(no͝or′əs-thē′nē-ə, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A group of symptoms, including chronic physical and mental fatigue, weakness, and generalized aches and pains, formerly thought to result from exhaustion of the nervous system and now usually considered a psychological disorder. The term is no longer in clinical use in many parts of the world.

neu′ras·then′ic (-thĕn′ĭk) adj. & n.
neu′ras·then′i·cal·ly adv.

neurasthenia

[noo͡r′əsthē′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + a + sthenos, without strength
1 an abnormal condition that often follows depression, characterized by nervous exhaustion and a vague functional fatigue.
2 (in psychiatry) a stage in the recovery from a schizophrenic experience during which the patient is listless and apparently unable to cope with routine activities and relationships. neurasthenic, adj.

neurasthenia

Medical history
A condition described in the late 1800s as being uniquely American, believed to most commonly affect those who performed cerebral work (e.g., physicians, lawyers and inventors), which is now known as stress. Reported findings included a loss of interest in mental labour and heart disturbances. Neurasthenia was viewed as a reflection of the natural superiority of the American culture and a product of the progress and refinement of modern civilisation; treatments included cold water cures, diets, exercise, arsenic and many others.

neurasthenia

Psychology Effort syndrome A nonspecific finding, often associated with depression or anxiety disorders, characterized by fatigue, and inability to function Accompaniments Autonomic changes–eg, tachycardia, sighing, blushing, dysdiaphoresis; Pts may believe neurasthenia is organic, not psychological

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia

A state of constant fatigue, loss of motivation and energy and often insomnia and muscle aches associated with general and persistent unhappiness. In the present state of knowledge, and in the absence of any evidence of a cause, the state described as neurasthenia is considered not to be of organic origin and, in particular, to have nothing to do with nerve function.

Neurasthenia

A term coined in the late nineteenth century to refer to a condition of chronic mental and physical weakness and fatigue. Some researchers regard MCS as a twentieth-century version of neurasthenia.

neurasthenia (nerˑ·s·thēˑ·nē·),

n term introduced by the American neurologist GM Beard to describe a condition characterized by irritability, lack of concentration, hypochondria, and worry.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]

neurasthenia (nyoo´rəsthē´nēə),

n a neurotic reaction characterized by chronic physical fatigue, listlessness, mental sluggishness, and, often, phobias.
References in periodicals archive ?
20) The concept of neurasthenia was well received in Germany.
Beard's neurasthenia stands in this lineage by positing some as yet undiscovered physiological weakness as the causation of nervous exhaustion (he believed that microscopes were not yet powerful enough to see the lesion).
Rhoda's hysteria, then, represents the curse of the sinning fathers, of the Anglo-Saxon men who first enslaved her ancestors - and in some sense of Howells himself, who feared his own daughter, Winifred, had inherited the neurasthenia with which he, and his wife Elinor, had struggled their entire lives.
Male and female out-patients between 18 and 70 years of age who suffered from either neurasthenia (ICD10 F48.
The concept raises several intriguing historical questions: Why did it originate in the first place, quite early in the century, when other concepts, notably neurasthenia, were already available?
The herb acts as an antitussive which is due to a CNS inhibitory action, and is used in the treatment of neurasthenia and child paralysis (Huang, 1999; Hsu et al.
Magnoliaceae used as an astringent and also as a tonic for neurasthenia 13.
His characterization of what he calls the "first biological psychiatry" is followed by the requisite chapter on nerves, neurasthenia, and the rest cure, trends that helped lay the foundations for the twentieth-century private office practice of psychiatry.
Attention to neurasthenia in the 1880s called forth new concern for the adequacy of sleep.
At bottom, doctors found theories of irritation and reflex neurosis appealing because they suggested that inexplicable mental disorders and other baffling syndromes like neurasthenia ha a discrete somatic basis.
British treatments for neurasthenia were similar to those in the United States, a comparison Oppenheim does not explore.
Tom Lutz has written a thoughtful and theoretically sophisticated book about the discourse concerning neurasthenia, a psychological disorder that apparently afflicted large numbers of bourgeois and elite people in turn-of-the-century America.