neurapraxia


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Related to neurapraxia: axonotmesis, Neuropraxia

neurapraxia

 [noor″ah-prak´se-ah]
failure of nerve conduction in the absence of structural changes, due to blunt injury, compression, or ischemia.

neur·a·prax·i·a

(nūr'ă-prak'sē-ă), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation neuropraxia. Avoid the jargonistic use of this word in the general sense of 'nerve lesion'.
The mildest type of focal nerve lesion that produces clinical deficits; localized loss of conduction along a nerve without axon degeneration; caused by a focal lesion, usually demyelinating, but occasionally ischemic (when of shorter than a few hours' duration), followed by a complete recovery.
See also: axonotmesis.
[neur- + G. a- priv. + praxis, action]

neurapraxia

/neu·ra·prax·ia/ (-prak´se-ah) usually temporary failure of nerve conduction in the absence of structural changes, due to blunt injury, compression, or ischemia.

neurapraxia

[noo͡r′əprak′sē·ə]
the interruption of nerve conduction without loss of continuity of the axon.

neurapraxia

Neurology Partial or complete conduction block over a segment of a nerve fiber, with temporary paralysis. See Cervical cord neurapraxia, Chronic recurrent root neurapraxia.

neu·ra·prax·i·a

(nūr'ă-prak'sē-ă)
The mildest type of focal nerve lesion that produces clinical deficits; localized loss of conduction along a nerve without axon degeneration; caused by a focal lesion, usually demyelinating, and followed by a complete recovery.
See also: axonotmesis
[neur-+ G. a- priv. + praxis, action]

neurapraxia

A peripheral nerve injury featuring temporary failure of conduction of impulses, usually due to compression without severance.

neurapraxia

nerve injury resulting in short-term neural dysfunction, followed by complete recovery; see axonotemesis; neurotmesis

neurapraxia (neˈ·r·prakˑ·sē·),

n nerve condition characterized by localized loss of conduction that causes short-term paralysis. There is no degeneration of the axon and complete recovery is usual.

neu·ra·prax·i·a

(nūr'ă-prak'sē-ă)
Mildest type of focal nerve lesion that produces clinical deficits.
[neur- + G. a- priv. + praxis, action]

neurapraxia

failure of nerve conduction in the absence of structural changes, due to blunt injury, compression or ischemia.

mandibular neurapraxia
see mandibular neurapraxia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congenital spinal stenosis associated with cord neurapraxia is a contraindication to sports participation, although there is some controversy over whether it should be considered absolute or relative.
When transient neurapraxias were separated from the analysis, the difference in complication rates between endoscopic and open procedures was minimal- 0.
d)- (e)) Poor clinical outcome especially in forward elevation due to axillary nerve neurapraxia.
1) Our patient, who had a minor whiplash injury, was asymptomatic for more than four hours before developing neurapraxia like features, lasting for less than two hours.
Key Words: anaesthesia, robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, robotic surgery, laparoscopy, head-down tilt, respiratory distress, stridor, laryngeal oedema, brachial plexus neurapraxia, complications
They concluded that this cervical stenosis was the factor that explains the appearance of spinal cord neurapraxia.
Initially, these findings were attributed to neurapraxia of both the LACN and posterior interosseus nerve (PIN) caused by intraoperative retraction.
This transient nerve injury was most likely caused by iatrogenic neurapraxia due to either stretching or pulling of the nerve during dissection or close cauterization of adjacent tissue with the bipolar electrocoagulator.
Much of the currentknowledge of peripheral nerve anatomy and physiology was observed by Sunderland, who developed the following classification for peripheral nerve lesions: grade I, neurapraxia; grade II, axonotmesis; grade III, mixed neurapraxia and axonotmetic lesion; grade IV, neurotmesis with continuity of the epineurium; grade V, complete nerve section.
Additionally, there were five deaths of unspecified etiology, thee high spinal anesthesias, three transient ischemic attacks, two seizures, two severe headachse, two spinal cord edemas, one brainstem edema with herniation, one brain edema with reversible ischemic neurologic deficit, one cortical blindness due to air embolus, one cervical epidural hematoma, one paraspinal hematoma, one peripheral neurapraxia, and one vasovagal response.
34) They followed the patients for only 28 months, but there was a 33% peri operative complication rate, including alveolus fractures, neurapraxia of the peroneal nerve, and component malposition.
In addition to the known risk of hip arthroscopy, which include iatrogenic damage to the labrum and cartilage and neurapraxia, risks specific to this procedure include but are not limited to damage to the retinacular blood supply and a potential stress riser along the femoral neck.