neuraminidase


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Related to neuraminidase: sialic acid, Neuraminidase inhibitor

sialidase

 [si-al´ĭ-dās]
1. an enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the cleavage of glucosidic linkages between a sialic acid residue and a hexose or hexosamine residue at the nonreducing terminal of oligosaccharides in glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. Deficiency of it is an autosomal recessive trait and is seen in sialidosis and galactosialidosis.
2. the enzyme with this activity specifically cleaving sialic acid–containing gangliosides; it is deficient in mucolipidosis IV. Called also neuraminidase.

si·al·i·dase

(sī-al'i-dās),
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal acetylneuraminic residues from oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, or glycolipids; present on the surface antigen in myxoviruses; used in histochemistry to selectively remove sialomucins, as from bronchial mucous glands and the small intestine; a deficiency of this enzyme produces sialidosis.
Synonym(s): neuraminidase

neuraminidase

/neu·ra·min·i·dase/ (-ah-min´ĭ-dās) an enzyme of the surface coat of myxoviruses that destroys the neuraminic acid of the cell surface during attachment, thereby preventing hemagglutination.

neuraminidase

(no͝or′ə-mĭn′ĭ-dās′, -dāz′, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A hydrolytic enzyme that removes sialic acid from glycoproteins and is found in many cells and viruses. It occurs on the surface of influenza viruses and enables the release of newly replicated viruses from infected cells.

neuraminidase

[noo͡r′əmē′nədās]
an enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of N-acetyl neuraminic acid from mucopolysaccharides. A hereditary deficiency of the enzyme causes sialidosis and is associated with galactogialidosis; it is characterized by mental retardation and skeletal changes, especially dysotosis multiplex. Also called sialidase. See also sialidosis.

neuraminidase

1. an enzyme that cleaves the terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid from mucoproteins.
2. a structural component occurring as a spike in the envelope of ortho- and paramyxoviruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The majority of published reports concerning the use of antiviral agents to control institutional influenza outbreaks arc based on studies of influenza A outbreaks in nursing home populations in whom amantadine was administered, so there is less information available concerning the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (ie, zanamivir, oseltamivir) in influenza A or B institutional outbreaks.
Plug' drugs: Inhibit neuraminidase in all versions of flu bug.
Consistent with results of other studies (1,2,5,6), we found that neuraminidase of A/ Hangzhou/1/2013(H7N9) virus was closely related to that of A/wild bird/Korea/A3/2011(H7N9) virus (9).
FIGURE 9 GLOBAL MARKET FOR NEURAMINIDASE INHIBITORS,
In the six trials totaling nearly 2,000 subjects in which administration of antibiotics was an end point, treatment with a neuraminidase inhibitor conferred a 23% reduction in the use of antibiotic therapy, he continued.
Viruses isolated from patients during the first two weeks of the current outbreak already have changes on the outer surface of the neuraminidase protein that could interfere with antibodies against the virus or b alter the effectiveness of future vaccines.
Detachment of endothelium and epithelium from the glomerular basement membrane produced by kidney perfusion with neuraminidase.
Comment: Tamiflu is one of two available neuraminidase inhibitors, which work by blocking the influenza enzyme that promotes viral release from infected cells.
Inavir([R]) is the first drug of a new class of long acting neuraminidase inhibitors (LANIs) to address the limitation of the current products, which require daily or more frequent dosing.
InavirA is a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor developed by Daiichi Sankyo which is manufactured in Japan.
Two classes of antiviral drugs are approved for management of influenza A infections, neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) and matrix 2 protein (M2) blockers (adamantanes).
They showed that this is accomplished by the influenza virus utilizing the enzymatic activity of the neuraminidase protein to neutralize the NK cells' receptors that are responsible for detecting the influenza-virus-infected cells.