neostigmine


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Related to neostigmine: Pyridostigmine, Edrophonium, glycopyrrolate

neostigmine

 [ne″o-stig´mēn]
an anticholinesterase and prokinetic agent used for the symptomatic treatment of myasthenia gravis, for prevention and treatment of postoperative stasis and atony of the gastrointestinal tract or urinary bladder, and for reversal of the effects of certain neuromuscular blocking agents, such as tubocurarine, after surgery. Available as neostigmine bromide and neostigmine methylsulfate.

neostigmine

/neo·stig·mine/ (-stig´mēn) a cholinergic (cholinesterase inhibitor), used as the bromide or methylsulfate salt in the treatment of myasthenia gravis, in the prevention and treatment of postoperative stasis and atony of the gastrointestinal tract or urinary bladder, and for postsurgical reversal of the effects of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents.

neostigmine

(nē′ō-stĭg′mēn, -mĭn)
n.
A cholinesterase inhibitor that is given in the form of a bromide salt, C12H19BrN2O2, or a methyl sulfate, C13H22N2O6S, used to treat myasthenia gravis and muscle atony and to reverse the effects of muscle relaxants after surgery.

neostigmine

Pharmacology An anticholinesterase used for the symptomatic therapy of myasthenia gravis and, in anesthesiology, to reverse the effects of depolarizing agents. See Myasthenia gravis, Reversal agent.

neostigmine

An ANTICHOLINESTERASE drug used in the treatment of MYASTHENIA GRAVIS. Neostigmine interferes with the enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE and so prolongs its action. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Robinul neostigmine.

neostigmine

A reversible anticholinesterase drug, which neutralizes the effect of acetylcholinesterase and thereby allows the prolonged action of acetylcholine on the iris and ciliary muscle. Its action is similar to physostigmine but it is not so irritating a miotic. Both are occasionally used in the treatment of glaucoma. See acetylcholine; parasympathomimetic; physostigmine; miosis; miotics.

neostigmine

an anticholinesterase used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis and glaucoma and as an antidote for nondepolarizing muscle relaxants, such as tubocurarine.

neostigmine test
muscle weakness caused by myastenia gravis is temporarily reversed following the administration of neostigmine; used as a diagnostic test.
References in periodicals archive ?
61 l in the patients who were administered neostigmine (p=0.
The midcostal region of the left hemidiaphragm with the phrenic nerve attached was removed and prepared for in vitro measurement of the antagonistic actions of neostigmine.
Conclusion: We concluded that neostigmine as an adjunct to lignocaine improves quality of anesthesia and is beneficial in IVRA.
Neostigmine is a parasympathomimetic cholinesterase inhibitor that is frequently used to reverse the effects of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockade (Nair & Hunter 2004).
Although intramuscular or subcutaneous injections of neostigmine are used for urinary retention and off label to stimulate the bowel, nearly all of the pregnancy data come from its use for symptomatic control of myasthenia gravis.
With one exception, which show an unexplained potentiation of neostigmine stimulated colon activity, all other studies result in effects, indicating a substantial spasmolytic effect of PO of the smooth muscles of the gastrointestinal tract.
Poster Presentation: Mo1101: Pulse-Irrigation Enhanced Evacuation and MoviPrep with Adjunctive Neostigmine and Glycopyrrolate Improve Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy After Spinal Cord Injury
To maximise postoperative analgesia, several adjuvants, such as opioids [2] Clonidine, [3] ketamine, [4] neostigmine, [5] etc.
The current literature states that the principal disadvantage of Neostigmine is its failure to effectively treat intensive and profound residual relaxation; this is contrary to the results reported with Sugammadex, of proven efficacy for any Rp condition, regardless of intensity, but with a higher cost and no proven effect over the benzilisoquinolonelike nondepolarizing relaxants such as Cisatracurium.
The recovery of the effects of nondepolarising neuromuscular blockers is accomplished through the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as neostigmine.
In this study, we present a case diagnosed with transient neonatal MG that has developed intestinal perforation after neostigmine treatment.